Yield stress- and zeta potential-pH behaviour of washed α-Al2O3 suspensions with relatively high Ca(II) and Mg(II) concentrations: Hydrolysis product and bridging

Shumin Zhu, L. Avadiar, Yee-Kwong K. Leong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. The abrupt change in the zeta potential-pH trend at pH 7 showed that positively charged hydrolysis products of both Mg(II) and Ca(II) ions are adsorbed on washed positively charged alumina particles. This pH is much lower than that predicted pH from equilibrium data for the formation of these hydrolysis products. Surface induced hydrolysis has been attributed by others as being responsible. The yield stress-pH curve was also shifted to a much higher pH in the presence of Mg(II) and Ca(II). The maximum yield stress of the washed alumina suspension at pH 9.5 was shifted to pH 12 and 13 by Mg(II) and Ca(II) additives respectively. The magnitude of the maximum yield stress in the presence of Mg(II) and Ca(II) appeared to be larger or as large as that without these additives. The species diagrams of Mg(II) and Ca(II) were used to explain change in the zeta potential and yield stress behaviour with pH. Insoluble Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2 species are the predominant products at the pH of maximum yield stress. Precipitate bridging was invoked to explain the additional attractive force responsible for the larger maximum yield stress. Steric effect will also be present due to the adsorbed layer. The new phenomena observed here are due to the concentration of Mg(II) and Ca(II) employed, ranging from 0.002 to 0.41 M, being generally more than an order of magnitude larger than that used in previous studies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Mineral Processing
Volume148
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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