Yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus) tolerates waterlogging better than narrow-leafed lupin (L. angustifolius). I. Shoot and root growth in a controlled environment

C.L. Davies, David Turner, M. Dracup

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We studied the adaptation of narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius) and yellow lupin (L. luteus) to waterlogging because yellow lupin may have potential as a new legume crop for coarse-textured, acidic, waterlogging-prone areas in Western Australia. In a controlled environment, plants were waterlogged for 14 days at 28 or 56 days after sowing (DAS).Plants were more sensitive when waterlogged from 56 to 70 DAS than from 28 to 42 DAS, root growth was more sensitive than shoot growth, and leaf expansion was more sensitive than leaf dry weight accumulation. Waterlogging reduced the growth of narrow-leafed lupin (60-81%) more than that of yellow lupin (25-56%) and the response was more pronounced 2 weeks after waterlogging ceased than at the end of waterlogging. Waterlogging arrested net root growth in narrow-leafed lupin but not in yellow lupin, so that after 2 weeks of recovery the root dry weight of yellow lupin was the same as that of the control plants but in narrow-leafed lupin it was 62% less than the corresponding control plants. Both species produced equal amounts of hypocotyl root when waterlogged from 28 to 42 DAS but yellow lupin produced much greater amounts than narrow-leafed lupin when waterlogged from 56 to 70 DAS.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)701-709
Journal Australian Journal of Agricultural Research
Volume51
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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