Worldwide prevalence of smoking cessation in schizophrenia patients: A meta-analysis of comparative and observational studies

Liang Nan Zeng, Qian Qian Zong, Ling Zhang, Yuan Feng, Chee H. Ng, Gabor S. Ungvari, Li Gang Chen, Yu Tao Xiang

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Although the rate of cigarette smoking is high in schizophrenia patients, the prevalence of smoking cessation in this group is reportedly low. This meta-analysis aimed to examine the prevalence of cessation among schizophrenia patients worldwide. A systematic literature search in PubMed, PsycINFO, Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and Web of Science was performed from their inception date until 15 November 2018. Studies that reported prevalence of smoking cessation were synthesized using a random-effects model. Fourteen studies were included. The pooled prevalence of smoking cessation among schizophrenia patients was 14.0 % (95 % CI: 9.2–18.8 %; I2 = 97.3 %). Compared with schizophrenia patients, both healthy controls (OR = 0.45, 95 % CI:0.38−0.54, p < 0.001) and controls with other psychiatric disorders (OR = 0.79, 95 % CI:0.63−0.99, p = 0.004) had significantly higher prevalence of cessation. Subgroup and meta-regression analyses found that year of survey (after 2005), duration of smoking cessation (<6 months), outpatient setting and poor study quality were significantly associated with higher prevalence of smoking cessation. This meta-analysis found that the prevalence of smoking cessation was significantly lower among schizophrenia patients compared to healthy control and those with other psychiatric disorders. Better understanding of the barriers to smoking cessation and more effective measures for quitting smoking should be developed for patients with schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102190
JournalAsian Journal of Psychiatry
Volume54
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2020

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