Within- and between-person relationships between spontaneous self-affirmations, coping style, and wellbeing

Taylor Jane Sharouni, Rachel G. McClymont, Christopher Alcorn, Amanda L. Rebar, Kwok Hong Law, Ben Jackson, Nerina Caltabiano, James A. Dimmock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Web of Science)

Abstract

Self-affirmations—responding to self-threatening information by reflecting on positive values or strengths—help to realign working self-concept and may support adaptive coping and wellbeing. Little research has been undertaken on spontaneous self-affirmations in response to everyday threats, and less has been undertaken on the relationships between spontaneous self-affirmations, coping, and wellbeing. This study aimed to test both within- and between-person relationships between spontaneous self-affirmations, coping, and wellbeing, controlling for threat intensity and other outcomes. A repeated survey assessment design was adopted to achieve these aims. Outcome measures included approach coping, avoidance coping, positive affect, negative affect, and eudaimonic wellbeing. It was found that spontaneous self-affirmations positively predicted approach coping and positive affect at both within- and between-person levels, and eudaimonic wellbeing at the between-person level. Overall, spontaneous self-affirmations were positively associated with approach coping and aspects of wellbeing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)940-949
Number of pages10
JournalStress and Health
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

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