Why do cultured transplanted myoblasts die in vivo DNA quantification shows enhanced survival of donor male myoblasts in host mice depleted of CD4+ and CD8+ cells or NK1.1+ cells

S.I. Hodgetts, Manfred Beilharz, Tony Scalzo, M.D. Grounds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

117 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Overcoming the massive and rapid death of injected donor myoblasts is the primary hurdle for successful myoblast transfer therapy (MTT), designed as a treatment for the lethal childhood myopathy Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The injection of male myoblasts into female host mice and quantification of surviving male DNA using the Y-chromosome-specific (Y1) probe allows the speed and extent of death of donor myoblasts to be determined. Cultured normal C57BL/10Sn male donor myoblasts were injected into untreated normal C57BL/10Sn and dystrophic mdx female host mice and analyzed by slot blots using a P-32-labeled Y1 probe. The amount of male DNA from donor myoblasts showed a remarkable decrease within minutes and by 1 h represented only about 10-18% of the 2.5 x 10(5) cells originally injected (designated 100%). This declined further over 1 week to approximately 1-4%. The host environment (normal or dystrophic) as well as the extent of passaging in tissue culture (early "P3" or late "P15-20" passage) made no difference to this result. Modulation of the host response by CD4(+)/CD8(+)-depleting antibodies administered prior to injection of the cultured myoblasts dramatically enhanced donor myoblast survival in dystrophic mdx hosts (15-fold relative to untreated hosts after 1 week). NK1.1 depletion also dramatically enhanced donor myoblast survival in dystrophic mdx hosts (21-fold after 1 week) compared to untreated hosts. These results provide a strategic approach to enhance donor myoblast survival in clinical trials of MTT.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)489-502
JournalCell Transplantation
Volume9
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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