Who needs Statistics?

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

    Abstract

    The use of statistics as a tool has greatly increased over the last twenty years, mainly because computers and statistical packages have made the collection, storage and analysis of data more accessible. This has meant that researchers with a wide variety of statistical preparation and backgrounds are now using statistics. But what is the quality of the statistical work? And has the teaching and learning of statistics experienced a reciprocal increase? This research covers two aspects. First, we examine PhD thesis in Australian and New Zealand universities regarding the quality of the statistical analysis. PhD theses were selected as they are the stepping stone to research and innovation. The support available to research students at each university is also investigated. Analysis of data indicates which variables are associated with the correctness of statistical methodology. We also investigate the level of statistics covered in undergraduate science degrees in the same Australian and New Zealand universities. The results reveal a scenario much worse than perhaps anticipated. The findings of the study are relevant to Australia’s future in a competitive global market.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationOZCOTS 2016
    Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 9th Australian Conference on Teaching Statistics
    EditorsHelen MacGillivray, Michael A. Martin, Brian Phillips
    Place of PublicationAustralia
    PublisherStatistical Society of Australia
    Pages105-110
    Number of pages6
    ISBN (Print)978-0-9805950-2-4
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016
    Event9th Australian Conference on Teaching Statistics - Canberra, Australia
    Duration: 5 Dec 20169 Dec 2016

    Conference

    Conference9th Australian Conference on Teaching Statistics
    CountryAustralia
    CityCanberra
    Period5/12/169/12/16

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