What Can We Learn from Measuring Crime When Looking to Quantify the Prevalence and Incidence of Contract Cheating?

Joe Clare, Kiata Rundle

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Developing effective contract cheating detection and prevention strategies depends on accurate measurement. The variety of measurement methods in research has resulted in large variation in estimates of contract cheating prevalence and incidence. Criminology has resolved similar measurement issues by triangulating multiple, imperfect datasets (e.g., victim surveys and police records) to quantify crime and expose the ‘dark figure of crime’ (the volume of crime not officially recorded by justice agencies). This chapter critiques the methods used to measure contract cheating, draws parallels with approaches to measuring crime, and highlights lessons for contract cheating assessment that can be learned from measuring crime. We argue for increased use of mixed-methods and data triangulation in contract cheating research to assist the development and evaluation of detection and prevention strategies.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationContract Cheating in Higher Education
Subtitle of host publication Global Perspectives on Theory, Practice, and Policy
Editors Sarah Elaine Eaton, Guy J. Curtis, Brenda M. Stoesz, Joseph Clare, Kiata Rundle, Josh Seeland
Place of PublicationSwitzerland
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Chapter2
Pages15-28
Number of pages14
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-031-12680-2
ISBN (Print)978-3-031-12679-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Oct 2022

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