What can we learn from adult cochlear implant recipients with single-sided deafness who became elective non-users?

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Abstract

Objective: This retrospective study investigates the incidence of elective cochlear implant (CI) non-use amongst a cohort of adult CI recipients with single-sided deafness (SSD), identifies the causes that led to non-use, and assesses how non-use could be prevented. Methods: All adults with SSD who received a CI between 2008 and 2018 and who became elective CI non-users were included. Elective non-users were defined as CI recipients who decided to stop using their CI or, if explantation was necessary, refused reimplantation. Results: 5/114 (4.4%) adults with SSD who received a CI became elective non-users. The 5 non-users were a mean 44.2 years old (range 33–70 years) at implantation, had a mean duration of deafness of 7.1 years (range 0.5–20 years) at implantation, and used their CI for a mean 11.5 months (range 1.5–60 months) before (fully) discontinuing use. The primary cause of elective non-use was postoperative discouragement due to unrealistic expectations (4 participants) regarding sound perception with the CI or about the greater than expected level of commitment necessary for rehabilitation. Conclusions: Elective non-use among adult CI recipients with single-sided deafness was very rare and could be further prevented by comprehensive counselling to ensure that candidates have realistic expectations about the rehabilitation requirements and the outcomes with the CI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)220-227
JournalCochlear Implants International
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Jul 2020

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