What can cause the pulps of immature, permanent teeth with open apices to become necrotic and what treatment options are available for these teeth

Thomas Flanagan

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2014 Australian Society of Endodontology. Pulp necrosis of immature permanent teeth represents a significant challenge for clinical management as root development ceases and open apices remain. The aetiology of pulp necrosis in immature permanent teeth can include caries, trauma or the presence of the dental anomalies, dens invaginatus and dens evaginatus. Endodontic treatment is complicated by the resultant thin dentinal root walls and the lack of apical closure. The long-term prognosis is compromised by increased risk of cervical root fracture and reduced crown to root ratio. Currently there is a paradigm shift in the management of such cases from traditional apexification procedures towards regenerative endodontic procedures. Regenerative endodontics can promote continued root development and apical closure, which does not occur with calcium hydroxide or mineral trioxide aggregate apexification. As supporting evidence grows and clear treatment guidelines are developed for regenerative endodontics, it is likely to become the gold standard for management of such teeth.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-100
JournalAustralian Endodontic Journal
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Endodontics
Tooth
Apexification
Dental Pulp Necrosis
Calcium Hydroxide
Case Management
Crowns
Guidelines
Wounds and Injuries

Cite this

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abstract = "{\circledC} 2014 Australian Society of Endodontology. Pulp necrosis of immature permanent teeth represents a significant challenge for clinical management as root development ceases and open apices remain. The aetiology of pulp necrosis in immature permanent teeth can include caries, trauma or the presence of the dental anomalies, dens invaginatus and dens evaginatus. Endodontic treatment is complicated by the resultant thin dentinal root walls and the lack of apical closure. The long-term prognosis is compromised by increased risk of cervical root fracture and reduced crown to root ratio. Currently there is a paradigm shift in the management of such cases from traditional apexification procedures towards regenerative endodontic procedures. Regenerative endodontics can promote continued root development and apical closure, which does not occur with calcium hydroxide or mineral trioxide aggregate apexification. As supporting evidence grows and clear treatment guidelines are developed for regenerative endodontics, it is likely to become the gold standard for management of such teeth.",
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What can cause the pulps of immature, permanent teeth with open apices to become necrotic and what treatment options are available for these teeth. / Flanagan, Thomas.

In: Australian Endodontic Journal, Vol. 40, No. 3, 2014, p. 95-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T1 - What can cause the pulps of immature, permanent teeth with open apices to become necrotic and what treatment options are available for these teeth

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N2 - © 2014 Australian Society of Endodontology. Pulp necrosis of immature permanent teeth represents a significant challenge for clinical management as root development ceases and open apices remain. The aetiology of pulp necrosis in immature permanent teeth can include caries, trauma or the presence of the dental anomalies, dens invaginatus and dens evaginatus. Endodontic treatment is complicated by the resultant thin dentinal root walls and the lack of apical closure. The long-term prognosis is compromised by increased risk of cervical root fracture and reduced crown to root ratio. Currently there is a paradigm shift in the management of such cases from traditional apexification procedures towards regenerative endodontic procedures. Regenerative endodontics can promote continued root development and apical closure, which does not occur with calcium hydroxide or mineral trioxide aggregate apexification. As supporting evidence grows and clear treatment guidelines are developed for regenerative endodontics, it is likely to become the gold standard for management of such teeth.

AB - © 2014 Australian Society of Endodontology. Pulp necrosis of immature permanent teeth represents a significant challenge for clinical management as root development ceases and open apices remain. The aetiology of pulp necrosis in immature permanent teeth can include caries, trauma or the presence of the dental anomalies, dens invaginatus and dens evaginatus. Endodontic treatment is complicated by the resultant thin dentinal root walls and the lack of apical closure. The long-term prognosis is compromised by increased risk of cervical root fracture and reduced crown to root ratio. Currently there is a paradigm shift in the management of such cases from traditional apexification procedures towards regenerative endodontic procedures. Regenerative endodontics can promote continued root development and apical closure, which does not occur with calcium hydroxide or mineral trioxide aggregate apexification. As supporting evidence grows and clear treatment guidelines are developed for regenerative endodontics, it is likely to become the gold standard for management of such teeth.

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