Western Australia cigarette smokers have a fewer small lung nodules than North Americans on CT screening for lung cancer

C.P. Murray, P.M. Wong, J. Louw, Grant Waterer

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    To determine the prevalence of small lung nodules on low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) in a Western Australian cohort of asymptomatic long-term cigarette smokers and to compare this with a large, similarly derived cohort of North Americans from the Mayo Clinic Lung Cancer Screening Trial. Forty-nine asymptomatic long-term cigarette smokers of minimum age 50 years underwent a low-dose 64-slice helical CT of the lungs. Images were viewed on a soft copy reporting station with thin section axial and coronal images, maximum intensity projection images, and advanced image manipulation tools. The prevalence of all nodules was 39%, significantly lower than the Mayo Clinic cohort prevalence of 51% ( P <0.01, Fisher's exact test), despite the use of more advanced imaging technology and image manipulation designed to increase the sensitivity for nodules. The prevalence of small nodules in asymptomatic long-term cigarette smokers in Western Australia is high, though significantly less than that found in a large study in North America. The authors postulate this is due to the relatively low rates of mycobacterium tuberculosis and soil-derived fungal pulmonary infections in Western Australia, as well as a lower degree of urban air pollution.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)339-344
    JournalJournal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology
    Volume53
    Issue number4
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

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