Voices across the fence: Commonality, difference and respectful practice across a half century of change

E.M. Hunter, Helen Milroy

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: To describe changes that have occurred in the field of indigenous mental health over the last 50 years. Conclusions: The last half-century has seen major advances in psychiatry and in the roles and capacities of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. Over the same period, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australia has been transformed by social and political forces that have brought both benefits and disappointments to Indigenous Australians. Indigenous mental health has evolved from a marginal interest in an 'exotic' area to a recognised field with its own issues, competencies and training needs. In this paper, two College Fellows consider these decades of change, presenting their reflections through voices that reflect different vantages despite a common destination. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2013.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)305-310
    JournalAustralasian Psychiatry
    Volume21
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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    Psychiatry
    New Zealand
    Mental Health

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    Voices across the fence: Commonality, difference and respectful practice across a half century of change. / Hunter, E.M.; Milroy, Helen.

    In: Australasian Psychiatry, Vol. 21, No. 4, 2013, p. 305-310.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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