Vitamin D content of australian native food plants and australian-grown edible seaweed

Laura J. Hughes, Lucinda J. Black, Jill L. Sherriff, Eleanor Dunlop, Norbert Strobel, Robyn M. Lucas, Janet F. Bornman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vitamin D has previously been quantified in some plants and algae, particularly in leaves of the Solanaceae family. We measured the vitamin D content of Australian native food plants and Australian-grown edible seaweed. Using liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, 13 samples (including leaf, fruit, and seed) were analyzed in duplicate for vitamin D2, vitamin D3, 25-hydroxyvitamin D2, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. Five samples contained vitamin D2: raw wattleseed (Acacia victoriae) (0.03 µg/100 g dry weight (DW)); fresh and dried lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora) leaves (0.03 and 0.24 µg/100 g DW, respectively); and dried leaves and berries of Tasmanian mountain pepper (Tasmannia lanceolata) (0.67 and 0.05 µg/100 g DW, respectively). Fresh kombu (Lessonia corrugata) contained vitamin D3 (0.01 µg/100 g DW). Detected amounts were low; however, it is possible that exposure to ultraviolet radiation may increase the vitamin D content of plants and algae if vitamin D precursors are present.

Original languageEnglish
Article number876
JournalNutrients
Volume10
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jul 2018

Fingerprint

edible seaweed
Seaweed
Edible Plants
food plants
vitamin D
algae
Vitamin D
Backhousia citriodora
ergocalciferol
Ergocalciferols
Weights and Measures
cholecalciferol
Cholecalciferol
Tasmannia lanceolata
leaves
25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2
Fruit
25-hydroxyergocalciferol
Family Leave
Myrtus

Cite this

Hughes, L. J., Black, L. J., Sherriff, J. L., Dunlop, E., Strobel, N., Lucas, R. M., & Bornman, J. F. (2018). Vitamin D content of australian native food plants and australian-grown edible seaweed. Nutrients, 10(7), [876]. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070876
Hughes, Laura J. ; Black, Lucinda J. ; Sherriff, Jill L. ; Dunlop, Eleanor ; Strobel, Norbert ; Lucas, Robyn M. ; Bornman, Janet F. / Vitamin D content of australian native food plants and australian-grown edible seaweed. In: Nutrients. 2018 ; Vol. 10, No. 7.
@article{6d927d0d2e264e9288093637ddffdb67,
title = "Vitamin D content of australian native food plants and australian-grown edible seaweed",
abstract = "Vitamin D has previously been quantified in some plants and algae, particularly in leaves of the Solanaceae family. We measured the vitamin D content of Australian native food plants and Australian-grown edible seaweed. Using liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, 13 samples (including leaf, fruit, and seed) were analyzed in duplicate for vitamin D2, vitamin D3, 25-hydroxyvitamin D2, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. Five samples contained vitamin D2: raw wattleseed (Acacia victoriae) (0.03 µg/100 g dry weight (DW)); fresh and dried lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora) leaves (0.03 and 0.24 µg/100 g DW, respectively); and dried leaves and berries of Tasmanian mountain pepper (Tasmannia lanceolata) (0.67 and 0.05 µg/100 g DW, respectively). Fresh kombu (Lessonia corrugata) contained vitamin D3 (0.01 µg/100 g DW). Detected amounts were low; however, it is possible that exposure to ultraviolet radiation may increase the vitamin D content of plants and algae if vitamin D precursors are present.",
keywords = "Algae, Liquid chromatography, Liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-QQQ), Plants, Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), Triple quadrupole, Vitamin D",
author = "Hughes, {Laura J.} and Black, {Lucinda J.} and Sherriff, {Jill L.} and Eleanor Dunlop and Norbert Strobel and Lucas, {Robyn M.} and Bornman, {Janet F.}",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
day = "6",
doi = "10.3390/nu10070876",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "Nutrients",
issn = "2072-6643",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
number = "7",

}

Hughes, LJ, Black, LJ, Sherriff, JL, Dunlop, E, Strobel, N, Lucas, RM & Bornman, JF 2018, 'Vitamin D content of australian native food plants and australian-grown edible seaweed' Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 7, 876. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070876

Vitamin D content of australian native food plants and australian-grown edible seaweed. / Hughes, Laura J.; Black, Lucinda J.; Sherriff, Jill L.; Dunlop, Eleanor; Strobel, Norbert; Lucas, Robyn M.; Bornman, Janet F.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 10, No. 7, 876, 06.07.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vitamin D content of australian native food plants and australian-grown edible seaweed

AU - Hughes, Laura J.

AU - Black, Lucinda J.

AU - Sherriff, Jill L.

AU - Dunlop, Eleanor

AU - Strobel, Norbert

AU - Lucas, Robyn M.

AU - Bornman, Janet F.

PY - 2018/7/6

Y1 - 2018/7/6

N2 - Vitamin D has previously been quantified in some plants and algae, particularly in leaves of the Solanaceae family. We measured the vitamin D content of Australian native food plants and Australian-grown edible seaweed. Using liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, 13 samples (including leaf, fruit, and seed) were analyzed in duplicate for vitamin D2, vitamin D3, 25-hydroxyvitamin D2, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. Five samples contained vitamin D2: raw wattleseed (Acacia victoriae) (0.03 µg/100 g dry weight (DW)); fresh and dried lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora) leaves (0.03 and 0.24 µg/100 g DW, respectively); and dried leaves and berries of Tasmanian mountain pepper (Tasmannia lanceolata) (0.67 and 0.05 µg/100 g DW, respectively). Fresh kombu (Lessonia corrugata) contained vitamin D3 (0.01 µg/100 g DW). Detected amounts were low; however, it is possible that exposure to ultraviolet radiation may increase the vitamin D content of plants and algae if vitamin D precursors are present.

AB - Vitamin D has previously been quantified in some plants and algae, particularly in leaves of the Solanaceae family. We measured the vitamin D content of Australian native food plants and Australian-grown edible seaweed. Using liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, 13 samples (including leaf, fruit, and seed) were analyzed in duplicate for vitamin D2, vitamin D3, 25-hydroxyvitamin D2, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. Five samples contained vitamin D2: raw wattleseed (Acacia victoriae) (0.03 µg/100 g dry weight (DW)); fresh and dried lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora) leaves (0.03 and 0.24 µg/100 g DW, respectively); and dried leaves and berries of Tasmanian mountain pepper (Tasmannia lanceolata) (0.67 and 0.05 µg/100 g DW, respectively). Fresh kombu (Lessonia corrugata) contained vitamin D3 (0.01 µg/100 g DW). Detected amounts were low; however, it is possible that exposure to ultraviolet radiation may increase the vitamin D content of plants and algae if vitamin D precursors are present.

KW - Algae

KW - Liquid chromatography

KW - Liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-QQQ)

KW - Plants

KW - Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D)

KW - Triple quadrupole

KW - Vitamin D

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85050026223&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3390/nu10070876

DO - 10.3390/nu10070876

M3 - Article

VL - 10

JO - Nutrients

JF - Nutrients

SN - 2072-6643

IS - 7

M1 - 876

ER -

Hughes LJ, Black LJ, Sherriff JL, Dunlop E, Strobel N, Lucas RM et al. Vitamin D content of australian native food plants and australian-grown edible seaweed. Nutrients. 2018 Jul 6;10(7). 876. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070876