Vitamin B-12 Status during Pregnancy and Child's IQ at Age 8: A Mendelian Randomization Study in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children

C. Bonilla, D.A. Lawlor, A.E. Taylor, D.J. Gunnell, Y. Ben-Shlomo, A.R. Ness, N.J. Timpson, B.S. Pourcain, S.M. Ring, P.M. Emmett, A.D. Smith, H. Refsum, Craig Pennell, Marie-Jo Brion, G.D. Smith, S.J. Lewis

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    Abstract

    Vitamin B-12 is essential for the development and maintenance of a healthy nervous system. Brain development occursprimarily in utero and early infancy, but the role of maternal vitamin B-12 status during pregnancy on offspring cognitivefunction is unclear. In this study we assessed the effect of vitamin B-12 status in well-nourished pregnant women on thecognitive ability of their offspring in a UK birth cohort (ALSPAC). We then examined the association of SNPs in maternalgenes FUT2 (rs492602) and TCN2 (rs1801198, rs9606756) that are related to plasma vitamin B-12, with offspring IQ.Observationally, there was a positive association between maternal vitamin B-12 intake and child’s IQ that was markedlyattenuated after adjustment for potential confounders (mean difference in offspring IQ score per doubling of maternal B-12intake, before adjustment: 2.0 (95% CI 1.3, 2.8); after adjustment: 0.7 (95% CI 20.04, 1.4)). Maternal FUT2 was weaklyassociated with offspring IQ: mean difference in IQ per allele was 0.9 (95% CI 0.1, 1.6). The expected effect of maternalvitamin B-12 on offspring IQ, given the relationships between SNPs and vitamin B-12, and SNPs and IQ was consistent withthe observational result. Our findings suggest that maternal vitamin B-12 may not have an important effect on offspringcognitive ability. However, further examination of this issue is warranted.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)9pp
    JournalPLoS One
    Volume7
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 5 Dec 2012

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    vitamin B12
    Vitamin B 12
    Random Allocation
    longitudinal studies
    Longitudinal Studies
    Parents
    pregnancy
    Pregnancy
    Mothers
    Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
    Social Adjustment
    Aptitude
    Neurology
    infancy
    pregnant women
    nervous system
    Nervous System
    Pregnant Women
    Brain
    Alleles

    Cite this

    Bonilla, C. ; Lawlor, D.A. ; Taylor, A.E. ; Gunnell, D.J. ; Ben-Shlomo, Y. ; Ness, A.R. ; Timpson, N.J. ; Pourcain, B.S. ; Ring, S.M. ; Emmett, P.M. ; Smith, A.D. ; Refsum, H. ; Pennell, Craig ; Brion, Marie-Jo ; Smith, G.D. ; Lewis, S.J. / Vitamin B-12 Status during Pregnancy and Child's IQ at Age 8: A Mendelian Randomization Study in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. In: PLoS One. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 12. pp. 9pp.
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    title = "Vitamin B-12 Status during Pregnancy and Child's IQ at Age 8: A Mendelian Randomization Study in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children",
    abstract = "Vitamin B-12 is essential for the development and maintenance of a healthy nervous system. Brain development occursprimarily in utero and early infancy, but the role of maternal vitamin B-12 status during pregnancy on offspring cognitivefunction is unclear. In this study we assessed the effect of vitamin B-12 status in well-nourished pregnant women on thecognitive ability of their offspring in a UK birth cohort (ALSPAC). We then examined the association of SNPs in maternalgenes FUT2 (rs492602) and TCN2 (rs1801198, rs9606756) that are related to plasma vitamin B-12, with offspring IQ.Observationally, there was a positive association between maternal vitamin B-12 intake and child’s IQ that was markedlyattenuated after adjustment for potential confounders (mean difference in offspring IQ score per doubling of maternal B-12intake, before adjustment: 2.0 (95{\%} CI 1.3, 2.8); after adjustment: 0.7 (95{\%} CI 20.04, 1.4)). Maternal FUT2 was weaklyassociated with offspring IQ: mean difference in IQ per allele was 0.9 (95{\%} CI 0.1, 1.6). The expected effect of maternalvitamin B-12 on offspring IQ, given the relationships between SNPs and vitamin B-12, and SNPs and IQ was consistent withthe observational result. Our findings suggest that maternal vitamin B-12 may not have an important effect on offspringcognitive ability. However, further examination of this issue is warranted.",
    author = "C. Bonilla and D.A. Lawlor and A.E. Taylor and D.J. Gunnell and Y. Ben-Shlomo and A.R. Ness and N.J. Timpson and B.S. Pourcain and S.M. Ring and P.M. Emmett and A.D. Smith and H. Refsum and Craig Pennell and Marie-Jo Brion and G.D. Smith and S.J. Lewis",
    year = "2012",
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    Bonilla, C, Lawlor, DA, Taylor, AE, Gunnell, DJ, Ben-Shlomo, Y, Ness, AR, Timpson, NJ, Pourcain, BS, Ring, SM, Emmett, PM, Smith, AD, Refsum, H, Pennell, C, Brion, M-J, Smith, GD & Lewis, SJ 2012, 'Vitamin B-12 Status during Pregnancy and Child's IQ at Age 8: A Mendelian Randomization Study in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children' PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 12, pp. 9pp. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0051084

    Vitamin B-12 Status during Pregnancy and Child's IQ at Age 8: A Mendelian Randomization Study in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. / Bonilla, C.; Lawlor, D.A.; Taylor, A.E.; Gunnell, D.J.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Ness, A.R.; Timpson, N.J.; Pourcain, B.S.; Ring, S.M.; Emmett, P.M.; Smith, A.D.; Refsum, H.; Pennell, Craig; Brion, Marie-Jo; Smith, G.D.; Lewis, S.J.

    In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 12, 05.12.2012, p. 9pp.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Bonilla, C.

    AU - Lawlor, D.A.

    AU - Taylor, A.E.

    AU - Gunnell, D.J.

    AU - Ben-Shlomo, Y.

    AU - Ness, A.R.

    AU - Timpson, N.J.

    AU - Pourcain, B.S.

    AU - Ring, S.M.

    AU - Emmett, P.M.

    AU - Smith, A.D.

    AU - Refsum, H.

    AU - Pennell, Craig

    AU - Brion, Marie-Jo

    AU - Smith, G.D.

    AU - Lewis, S.J.

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    Y1 - 2012/12/5

    N2 - Vitamin B-12 is essential for the development and maintenance of a healthy nervous system. Brain development occursprimarily in utero and early infancy, but the role of maternal vitamin B-12 status during pregnancy on offspring cognitivefunction is unclear. In this study we assessed the effect of vitamin B-12 status in well-nourished pregnant women on thecognitive ability of their offspring in a UK birth cohort (ALSPAC). We then examined the association of SNPs in maternalgenes FUT2 (rs492602) and TCN2 (rs1801198, rs9606756) that are related to plasma vitamin B-12, with offspring IQ.Observationally, there was a positive association between maternal vitamin B-12 intake and child’s IQ that was markedlyattenuated after adjustment for potential confounders (mean difference in offspring IQ score per doubling of maternal B-12intake, before adjustment: 2.0 (95% CI 1.3, 2.8); after adjustment: 0.7 (95% CI 20.04, 1.4)). Maternal FUT2 was weaklyassociated with offspring IQ: mean difference in IQ per allele was 0.9 (95% CI 0.1, 1.6). The expected effect of maternalvitamin B-12 on offspring IQ, given the relationships between SNPs and vitamin B-12, and SNPs and IQ was consistent withthe observational result. Our findings suggest that maternal vitamin B-12 may not have an important effect on offspringcognitive ability. However, further examination of this issue is warranted.

    AB - Vitamin B-12 is essential for the development and maintenance of a healthy nervous system. Brain development occursprimarily in utero and early infancy, but the role of maternal vitamin B-12 status during pregnancy on offspring cognitivefunction is unclear. In this study we assessed the effect of vitamin B-12 status in well-nourished pregnant women on thecognitive ability of their offspring in a UK birth cohort (ALSPAC). We then examined the association of SNPs in maternalgenes FUT2 (rs492602) and TCN2 (rs1801198, rs9606756) that are related to plasma vitamin B-12, with offspring IQ.Observationally, there was a positive association between maternal vitamin B-12 intake and child’s IQ that was markedlyattenuated after adjustment for potential confounders (mean difference in offspring IQ score per doubling of maternal B-12intake, before adjustment: 2.0 (95% CI 1.3, 2.8); after adjustment: 0.7 (95% CI 20.04, 1.4)). Maternal FUT2 was weaklyassociated with offspring IQ: mean difference in IQ per allele was 0.9 (95% CI 0.1, 1.6). The expected effect of maternalvitamin B-12 on offspring IQ, given the relationships between SNPs and vitamin B-12, and SNPs and IQ was consistent withthe observational result. Our findings suggest that maternal vitamin B-12 may not have an important effect on offspringcognitive ability. However, further examination of this issue is warranted.

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