Vision, quality of life and depressive symptoms after first eye cataract surgery

M.L. Fraser, L.B. Meuleners, A.H. Lee, Jonathon Ng, Nigel Morlet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Cataract affects not only vision, but also performance of everyday tasks, participation in social activities, quality of life and possibly depression. Depression is a major health issue for older adults. It is estimated that 6%-20% of community-dwelling older Australians experience depression. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in vision-related quality of life and depressive symptoms after first eye cataract surgery and to determine which visual measures affect the change in these outcomes. Methods: In 2009 and 2010, 99 participants with bilateral cataract were recruited. Visual measures including visual acuity, contrast sensitivity and stereopsis were assessed 1 week before and 12 weeks after first eye cataract surgery. Vision-related quality of life was measured using the 25-item National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the 20-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Separate regression analyses were undertaken to determine the association between visual measures and changes in vision-related quality of life and depressive symptoms after first eye cataract surgery. Results: Overall, vision-related quality of life improved after first eye cataract surgery. There was a small, non-clinically significant improvement in depressive symptoms after surgery. Improvement in vision-related quality of life after first eye cataract surgery was associated with improved contrast sensitivity in the operated eye (P
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)237-243
JournalPsychogeriatrics
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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