Virulence factors of enteric Escherichia coli in young Aboriginal children in north-west Australia

S.T. Gunzburg, Barbara Chang, V. Burke, M. Gracey

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11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) were the most frequently identified enteric pathogens associated with diarrhoea in 0-5 year old Aboriginal children in tropical north-west Australia with an incidence similar to those from other tropical regions. Heat-stable toxin-producing (ST+) strains were associated with diarrhoea throughout the year but heat-labile toxin-producing (LT+) strains were more important in the monsoonal summer season. ST+ strains were commonest in children with diarrhoea between 6 and 18 months of age while LT+ strains were associated with diarrhoea in children aged 18-24 months. Verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) which produced VT1, but not VT2, and enteroadherent (EAF+) E. coli were significant causes of diarrhoea, mainly in children below 18 months but without a seasonal pattern.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-289
JournalEpidemiology and Infection
Volume109
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1992

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