Variation in incidence of pediatric Crohn's disease in relation to latitude and ambient ultraviolet radiation: A systematic review and analysis

E.A. Holmes, F. Xiang, Robyn Lucas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)
225 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Pediatric Crohn's disease (CD) is a lifelong, debilitating, and costly disease. In previous studies, CD incidence increased with higher geographic latitude in the Northern Hemisphere. This may indicate a role for lower vitamin D status as a risk factor for CD. Analysis of worldwide incidence of pediatric CD has not been previously reported.

Methods: We undertook a systematic review of population-based studies reporting incidence of pediatric CD and published between 2003 and 2013. Included studies had well-defined diagnostic criteria for CD, evidence of high case ascertainment, reported incidence according to age group, and provided a specific location. Average daily ambient ultraviolet radiation (UVR) for each location was derived from satellite data. Negative binomial regression was used to assess the association between pediatric CD incidence and latitude and ambient UVR, adjusting for the study year.

Results: Twenty-eight articles provided 39 incidence data points. Incidence of pediatric CD increased with higher latitude, and in association with a greater number of months where the average daily UVR was lower than a previously published threshold of 1.488 kJ/m 2. Incidence of pediatric CD increased over calendar time.

Conclusions: After applying rigorous quality assessment criteria, and including only population-based studies, there was a modest increase in incidence of pediatric CD with higher latitude and greater number of months with low ambient UVR. Reporting using nonconsistent diagnostic criteria and age groups, with poorly defined geographic locations, makes it difficult to compare data across different studies. Copyright © 2015 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)809-817
JournalInflammatory Bowel Diseases
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2015

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