Valuable New Resistances Ensure Improved Management of Sclerotinia Stem Rot (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum) in Horticultural and Oilseed Brassica Species

Mingpei P. You, Margaret B. Uloth, X. X. Li, S. S. Banga, S. K. Banga, Martin J. Barbetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Field resistances against Sclerotinia rot (SR) (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum) were determined in 52 Chinese genotypes of Brassica oleracea var. capitata, 14 Indian Brassica juncea genotypes carrying wild weedy Brassicaceae introgression(s) and four carrying B-genome introgression, 22 Australian commercial Brassica napus varieties, and 12 B.napus and B.juncea genotypes of known resistance. All plants were individually inoculated by securing an agar disc from a culture of S.sclerotiorum growing on a glucose-rich medium to the stem above the second internode with Parafilm tape. Mean stem lesion length across tested genotypes ranged from 68mm. While there was considerable diversity within the germplasm sets from each country, overall, 65% of the B.oleracea var. capitata genotypes from China showed the highest levels of stem resistance, a level comparable with the highest resistance ever recorded for oilseed B.napus or B.juncea from China or Australia. One Indian B.juncea line carrying weedy introgression displayed a significant level of both stem and leaf resistance. However, the vast majority of commercial Australian oilseed B.napus varieties fell within the most susceptible 40% of genotypes tested for stem disease. There was no correlation between expressions of stem versus leaf resistance, suggesting their independent inheritance. A few Chinese B.oleracea var. capitata genotypes that expressed combined extremely high-level stem (1mm length) and leaf (0.5 mean number of infections/plant) resistance will be particularly significant for developing new SR-resistant horticultural and oilseed Brassica varieties.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-299
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Phytopathology
Volume164
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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