‘Validated, easy to use and free’: top three requests for mobile device applications (‘apps’) from mental health consumers and clinicians

Milan Dragovic, Sophie Davison, Vera A. Morgan, Vivian W. Chiu, Neilson Richards, Tammy Vatskalis, Amanda Atkinson, Flavie Waters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Effective implementation of mobile applications into the mainstream of mental health care cannot be imposed without acknowledging consumers’ perspectives. This study investigated the willingness of mental health consumers and clinical staff to adopt new technology in their treatment. Method: A total of 74 mental health consumers and 116 clinical staff were recruited for the study. Survey data for consumers were collected using hard copies and for staff using the REDCap data management platform. Results: Both consumers and clinical staff reported positive attitudes towards the use of mobile applications in mental health care, emphasising their validity, ease of use and cost. Consumers were more likely to use apps supporting relaxation and time management than those targeting complex problems (alcohol, smoking, hearing voices). However, about half of consumers expressed concerns regarding privacy, and about 40% of them felt uncomfortable about providing personal information to clinicians. There was no association between demographic and clinical factors with the readiness to use mobile apps. Discussion: Findings from this study provided valuable recommendations for the implementation of mobile applications into health care services.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)106-114
Number of pages9
JournalAdvances in Mental Health
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 May 2020

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