Utilisation of Chronic Disease and Mental Health Management Services and Cardioprotective Medication Prescriptions in Primary Care for Patients With Cardiovascular Diseases and Cancer: A Cross-Sectional Study

Qiang Tu, Karice Hyun, Nashid Hafiz, Andrew Knight, Charlotte Hespe, Clara K. Chow, Tom Briffa, Robyn Gallagher, Christopher M. Reid, David L. Hare, Nicholas Zwar, Mark Woodward, Stephen Jan, Emily R. Atkins, Tracey Lea Laba, Elizabeth Halcomb, Matthew Hollings, Anna Singleton, Tim Usherwood, Julie Redfern

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors. Mental health is considered an important risk factor affecting the treatment of cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about the use of secondary prevention strategies for CVD in patients with both cancer and CVD. This study aimed to compare the utilisation of primary care chronic disease management plans, mental health care and guideline-indicated cardioprotective medications among CVD patients with and without cancer. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study utilising clinical data of patients with CVD from 50 Australian primary care practices. Outcomes included the use of chronic disease management plans, mental health care, guideline-indicated cardioprotective medications and influenza vaccination. Logistic regression, accounting for demographic and clinical covariates and clustering effects by practices, was used to compare the two groups. Results: Of the 15,040 patients with CVD, 1,486 patients (9.9%) concurrently had cancer. Patients with cancer, compared to those without, were older (77.6 vs 71.8 years, p<0.001), more likely to drink alcohol (62.6% vs 55.7%, p<0.001), have lower systolic (130.3±17.8 vs 132.5±21.1 mmHg, p<0.001) and diastolic (72.2±11 vs 75.3±34 mmHg, p<0.001) blood pressure. Although suboptimal for both groups, patients with cancer were significantly more likely to have general practice management plans (GPMPs) (51.4% vs 43.2%, p<0.001), coordination of team care arrangements (TCAs) (46.2% vs 37.0%, p<0.001), have a review of either GPMP or TCA (42.8% vs 34.7%, p<0.001), have a mental health treatment consultation (15.4% vs 10.5%, p=0.004) and be prescribed blood pressure-lowering medications (70.1% vs 66.0%, p=0.002). However, there were no statistical differences in the prescription of lipid-lowering or antiplatelet medications. After adjustments for covariates and multiple testing, patients with cancer did not show a difference in GPMPs, TCAs, and a review of either, but were more likely to receive mental health treatment consultations than those without cancer (odds ratio 1.76; 95% confidence interval 1.42–2.19). Conclusions: Less than half of patients with CVD had a GPMP, TCA or review of either. Although those patients with cancer were more likely to receive these interventions, still around half the patients did not. Medicare-funded GPMPs, TCAs and a review of either GPMP or TCA were underutilised, and future studies should seek to identify ways of improving access to these services.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)738-746
Number of pages9
JournalHeart Lung and Circulation
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2024

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