Using Structured Clinical Instruction Modules (SCIM) in teaching palliative care to undergraduate medical students

Kirsten Auret, Darren Starmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Student evaluation of the palliative care attachment at The University of Western Australia highlighted certain shortcomings. Methods. A 2-hour Structured Clinical Instruction Module (SCIM) workshop was designed and implemented to address these issues. Results. Preworkshop and postworkshop questionnaires showed a marked increase in self-rated competence and suggested this improvement was directly attributable to the workshop. A follow-up Survey of a small number of Students demonstrated this increase was sustained over time. Conclusions. SCIMs appear to be an effective instructional format in the small group setting. We covered a broad range of topics in a cost-effective manner and with minimal tutors and resources.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-155
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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