Using science fiction storytelling to decolonise representations of artificial intelligence: Exploring Zambian futures through smartphone filmmaking.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

This thesis unpacks the skew towards white Western outlooks in mainstream discourse, science communication, media, and cinematic stories about science and technology and answers growing calls for inclusive representation of non-Western perspectives in these arenas. Grounded in a technosocial lens from science, technology, and society studies (STS) and an interdisciplinary arts-based action research method, this creative thesis specifically leverages design fiction frameworks and smartphone filmmaking to resourcefully develop and realise three original short film screenplays inspired by Black Mirror, into webisodes that explore an African perspective on AI operating within mental health and well-being contexts in a fictional Zambian setting.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Bourgault Du Coudray, Chantal, Supervisor
  • Bray, Heather, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date27 Oct 2023
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2022

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