Use of underwater stereo-video to measure fish assemblage structure, spatial distribution of fishes and change in assemblages with protection from fishing

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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    Abstract

    [Truncated] Worldwide, the most common sampling technique used to assess the efficacy of marine protected areas is underwater visual census by SCUBA divers or snorkelers. The technique, however, suffers numerous biases, and limitations that have prompted researchers to question its ability to accurately assess fish assemblages and detect change. Justification for the establishment of marine protected areas is governed by the demonstrated ability of these areas to achieve their objectives of sustaining and rebuilding fisheries and preserving biodiversity. A new technique is therefore required that can accurately and precisely assess the structure of fish assemblages, ascertain and demonstrate whether the goals of marine protected areas are being achieved. This thesis investigates the use and ability of remote and diver-operated stereo-video systems to obtain accurate and precise measures of species richness, relative abundance and length of fish.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    DOIs
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2006

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