Use of a spreadsheet model to investigate the dynamics and the economics of a seeded abalone population

S. De Waal, P. A. Cook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using a simple spreadsheet model it was possible to investigate both the dynamics of a seeded abalone population and the economic implications of seeding such a population. The two variables used to drive the population model were the initial survival after seeding-induced mortality, and age-specific differential mortality. In the model, initial survival or initial population size was the variable that played the dominant role in determining the potential yield of any seeded population. In reality, seeding size plays a significant role in initial survival. Within the same experimental context, 14-mm animals showed a minimum survival of 24% while 26-mm animals showed a minimum of 56%, an exponential increase in potential yield. To address the issue of potential yield on a commercial scale, differential mortality amongst seeded populations of abalone needs to be researched. A cost-benefit analysis has shown that high production costs will only allow ranching to be economically viable in areas where the potential differential mortality regime is very favorable, where survival per age class increases as the population ages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)863-866
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Shellfish Research
Volume20
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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