Urinary steroid profiles and alcohol-related blood pressure elevation

T A Mori, I B Puddey, S P Wilkinson, L J Beilin, R Vandongen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. From an earlier cross-sectional survey of 343 public servants, 15 pairs of non-smoking teetotallers and heavy drinkers (alcohol intake more than 350 mL/week) were matched for age and adiposity and utilized for a case-control study of the effects of alcohol on 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 beta-OHSD) activity and blood pressure. 2. Two successive 24 h urine collections were analysed by radio-immunoassay (RIA) for cortisol excretion, and for the cortisol and cortisone metabolites, tetrahydrocortisol (THC), allo-tetrahydrocortisol (allo-THC) and tetrahydrocortisone (THE), by capillary column gas chromatography. 3. Heavy drinkers had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) than teetotallers (132.6 +/- 2.5 vs 123.2 +/- 1.3 and 78.7 +/- 1.6 vs 71.7 +/- 1.4, respectively; unpaired t-test, P less than 0.01). Twenty-four-hour urinary sodium and cortisol excretion were similar in the two groups. 4. The THC plus allo-THC:THE ratio was similar in drinkers and teetotallers (1.81 +/- 0.20 vs 2.03 +/- 0.20), consistent with no effect of alcohol on 11 beta-OHSD activity. The ratio of THC to allo-THC was increased in drinkers compared with teetotallers (1.49 +/- 0.18 vs 1.05 +/- 0.13; unpaired t-test, P less than 0.05), consistent with either a decrease in 5 alpha-reductase activity or an increase in 5 beta-reductase activity. 5. This study provides no evidence for alcohol-related inhibition of 11 beta-OHSD, despite substantially higher blood pressures in heavy drinkers compared to teetotallers. Such an effect is, therefore, unlikely to contribute significantly to the mechanism of alcohol-related hypertension.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-290
Number of pages4
JournalClinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1991
Event1990 ANNUAL MEETING OF THE HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE RESEARCH COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA - MELBOURNE, Australia
Duration: 13 Dec 199014 Dec 1990

Fingerprint

Tetrahydrocortisol
Steroids
Alcohols
Blood Pressure
Tetrahydrocortisone
Hydrocortisone
Cholestenone 5 alpha-Reductase
11-beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases
Hypertension
Urine Specimen Collection
Cortisone
Adiposity
Radio
Immunoassay
Gas Chromatography
Case-Control Studies
Oxidoreductases
Cross-Sectional Studies
Sodium

Cite this

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title = "Urinary steroid profiles and alcohol-related blood pressure elevation",
abstract = "1. From an earlier cross-sectional survey of 343 public servants, 15 pairs of non-smoking teetotallers and heavy drinkers (alcohol intake more than 350 mL/week) were matched for age and adiposity and utilized for a case-control study of the effects of alcohol on 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 beta-OHSD) activity and blood pressure. 2. Two successive 24 h urine collections were analysed by radio-immunoassay (RIA) for cortisol excretion, and for the cortisol and cortisone metabolites, tetrahydrocortisol (THC), allo-tetrahydrocortisol (allo-THC) and tetrahydrocortisone (THE), by capillary column gas chromatography. 3. Heavy drinkers had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) than teetotallers (132.6 +/- 2.5 vs 123.2 +/- 1.3 and 78.7 +/- 1.6 vs 71.7 +/- 1.4, respectively; unpaired t-test, P less than 0.01). Twenty-four-hour urinary sodium and cortisol excretion were similar in the two groups. 4. The THC plus allo-THC:THE ratio was similar in drinkers and teetotallers (1.81 +/- 0.20 vs 2.03 +/- 0.20), consistent with no effect of alcohol on 11 beta-OHSD activity. The ratio of THC to allo-THC was increased in drinkers compared with teetotallers (1.49 +/- 0.18 vs 1.05 +/- 0.13; unpaired t-test, P less than 0.05), consistent with either a decrease in 5 alpha-reductase activity or an increase in 5 beta-reductase activity. 5. This study provides no evidence for alcohol-related inhibition of 11 beta-OHSD, despite substantially higher blood pressures in heavy drinkers compared to teetotallers. Such an effect is, therefore, unlikely to contribute significantly to the mechanism of alcohol-related hypertension.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)",
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Urinary steroid profiles and alcohol-related blood pressure elevation. / Mori, T A; Puddey, I B; Wilkinson, S P; Beilin, L J; Vandongen, R.

In: Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, Vol. 18, No. 5, 05.1991, p. 287-290.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Urinary steroid profiles and alcohol-related blood pressure elevation

AU - Mori, T A

AU - Puddey, I B

AU - Wilkinson, S P

AU - Beilin, L J

AU - Vandongen, R

PY - 1991/5

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N2 - 1. From an earlier cross-sectional survey of 343 public servants, 15 pairs of non-smoking teetotallers and heavy drinkers (alcohol intake more than 350 mL/week) were matched for age and adiposity and utilized for a case-control study of the effects of alcohol on 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 beta-OHSD) activity and blood pressure. 2. Two successive 24 h urine collections were analysed by radio-immunoassay (RIA) for cortisol excretion, and for the cortisol and cortisone metabolites, tetrahydrocortisol (THC), allo-tetrahydrocortisol (allo-THC) and tetrahydrocortisone (THE), by capillary column gas chromatography. 3. Heavy drinkers had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) than teetotallers (132.6 +/- 2.5 vs 123.2 +/- 1.3 and 78.7 +/- 1.6 vs 71.7 +/- 1.4, respectively; unpaired t-test, P less than 0.01). Twenty-four-hour urinary sodium and cortisol excretion were similar in the two groups. 4. The THC plus allo-THC:THE ratio was similar in drinkers and teetotallers (1.81 +/- 0.20 vs 2.03 +/- 0.20), consistent with no effect of alcohol on 11 beta-OHSD activity. The ratio of THC to allo-THC was increased in drinkers compared with teetotallers (1.49 +/- 0.18 vs 1.05 +/- 0.13; unpaired t-test, P less than 0.05), consistent with either a decrease in 5 alpha-reductase activity or an increase in 5 beta-reductase activity. 5. This study provides no evidence for alcohol-related inhibition of 11 beta-OHSD, despite substantially higher blood pressures in heavy drinkers compared to teetotallers. Such an effect is, therefore, unlikely to contribute significantly to the mechanism of alcohol-related hypertension.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

AB - 1. From an earlier cross-sectional survey of 343 public servants, 15 pairs of non-smoking teetotallers and heavy drinkers (alcohol intake more than 350 mL/week) were matched for age and adiposity and utilized for a case-control study of the effects of alcohol on 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 beta-OHSD) activity and blood pressure. 2. Two successive 24 h urine collections were analysed by radio-immunoassay (RIA) for cortisol excretion, and for the cortisol and cortisone metabolites, tetrahydrocortisol (THC), allo-tetrahydrocortisol (allo-THC) and tetrahydrocortisone (THE), by capillary column gas chromatography. 3. Heavy drinkers had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) than teetotallers (132.6 +/- 2.5 vs 123.2 +/- 1.3 and 78.7 +/- 1.6 vs 71.7 +/- 1.4, respectively; unpaired t-test, P less than 0.01). Twenty-four-hour urinary sodium and cortisol excretion were similar in the two groups. 4. The THC plus allo-THC:THE ratio was similar in drinkers and teetotallers (1.81 +/- 0.20 vs 2.03 +/- 0.20), consistent with no effect of alcohol on 11 beta-OHSD activity. The ratio of THC to allo-THC was increased in drinkers compared with teetotallers (1.49 +/- 0.18 vs 1.05 +/- 0.13; unpaired t-test, P less than 0.05), consistent with either a decrease in 5 alpha-reductase activity or an increase in 5 beta-reductase activity. 5. This study provides no evidence for alcohol-related inhibition of 11 beta-OHSD, despite substantially higher blood pressures in heavy drinkers compared to teetotallers. Such an effect is, therefore, unlikely to contribute significantly to the mechanism of alcohol-related hypertension.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

KW - Adult

KW - Alcoholism

KW - Blood Pressure

KW - Case-Control Studies

KW - Cortisone

KW - Humans

KW - Hydrocortisone

KW - Hypertension

KW - Tetrahydrocortisol

KW - Tetrahydrocortisone

KW - Comparative Study

KW - Journal Article

KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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DO - 10.1111/j.1440-1681.1991.tb01447.x

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 287

EP - 290

JO - Clinical & Experimental Pharmacology & Physiology

JF - Clinical & Experimental Pharmacology & Physiology

SN - 0305-1870

IS - 5

ER -