Unravelling microbial interactions in aquatic ecosystems: an improved model of microbial controls on nutrient processing

Yu Li

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    186 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    [Truncated abstract] In order to control algal blooms, it is necessary to better understand microbial interactions in aquatic ecosystems. However, present ecological models, mainly based on the simple 'top-down' (consumer) view of controlling algal blooms, do not always provide an accurate picture of planktonic dynamics due to the complicated nature of microbial interactions. This study has developed serial ecological models building on the classic 'Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus' (NPZD) model to better understand the significance of specific microbial interactions in aquatic ecosystems, such as the microbial loop and the viral shunt. These interactions are relevant to 'bottom-up' (resource) control of algal blooms in aquatic ecosystems. Using Lake Kinneret (Israel) as a study site, the significance of key microbial loop processes on nutrient supply and stoichiometry is further examined by applying a one dimensional coupled hydrodynamic-ecosystem model (DYRESM-CAEDYM) to a comprehensive dataset (1997-2001). In the first study, the potential significance two types of microbial interactions in aquatic ecosystems have been theoretically explored. The improved serial models for the microbial loop and the viral shunt illustrate the importance of 'bottom-up' (resource) control of algal blooms via these microbial interactions in aquatic ecosystems. In the second study, the relationship between phytoplankton internal nutrient stoichiometry and water column N:P ratios has been investigated in a dynamic lake environment. The results showed that the average internal N:P ratios of the phytoplankton community followed the total carbon biomass seasonal patterns.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2013

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