Understanding the relationship between coping self-efficacy, coping behaviour and psychological wellbeing during recovery from stroke

Amanda Majella Ch'ng

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Although self-efficacy has long been established as an important variable for psychological wellbeing across a range of contexts, coping self-efficacy, a subtype of self-efficacy specific to the function of coping, has only recently begun to receive research attention. In addition, despite support from both self-efficacy theory and coping theory, the relationship between coping self-efficacy and coping behaviour in the face of stressful events has not previously been considered. This thesis explores the importance of coping self-efficacy for psychological wellbeing in a new context, recovery after stroke, and investigates the relationship between coping self-efficacy and coping behaviour in the face of this stressor. Stroke was selected as a suitable context for this exploration given its high incidence, lengthy recovery period and the prevalence of significant post stroke psychological distress. The thesis explores four key questions: (i) is coping self-efficacy related to psychological wellbeing for people recovering from stroke, (ii) what types of coping behaviours are related to coping self-efficacy during recovery, (iii) does coping behaviour mediate the relationship between coping self-efficacy and psychological outcomes, and (iv) what is the role of individual dispositional traits (optimism and trait anxiety) in these relations. The implications of these relationships for clinical intervention were a secondary focus of the project.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Publication statusUnpublished - 2008

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