Understanding Strategic Information Use During Emotional Expression Judgments in Williams Syndrome

Louise Ewing, Emily K. Farran, Annette Karmiloff-Smith, Marie L. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Detailed analysis of expression judgments in Williams syndrome reveals that successful emotion categorization need not reflect “classic” information processing strategies. These individuals draw upon a distinct set of featural details to identify happy and fearful faces that differ from those used by typically developing comparison groups: children and adults. The diagnostic visual information is also notably less interlinked in Williams syndrome, consistent with reports of diminished processing of configural information during face identity judgments. These results prompt reconsideration of typical models of face expertise by revealing that an age-appropriate profile of expression performance can be achieved via alternative routes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)323-335
Number of pages13
JournalDevelopmental Neuropsychology
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Jul 2017

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Williams Syndrome
Automatic Data Processing
Emotions

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Ewing, Louise ; Farran, Emily K. ; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette ; Smith, Marie L. / Understanding Strategic Information Use During Emotional Expression Judgments in Williams Syndrome. In: Developmental Neuropsychology. 2017 ; Vol. 42, No. 5. pp. 323-335.
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Understanding Strategic Information Use During Emotional Expression Judgments in Williams Syndrome. / Ewing, Louise; Farran, Emily K.; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Smith, Marie L.

In: Developmental Neuropsychology, Vol. 42, No. 5, 04.07.2017, p. 323-335.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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