Two theories of infinite sin : an analysis of the concept of infinite sin in the retributive-punishment theory of hell

Paul Kabay

    Research output: ThesisMaster's Thesis

    27 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    [Truncated] The central task of this thesis is, first, to analyse what it could mean for sin or sinfulness to be infinite, and secondly, to defend two theories of infinite sin from various objections. These tasks are an important part of defending a traditional theory of hell, namely the Retributive-Punishment Theory of hell.
    Chapter One consists of an account of the nature of hell and the problems that the doctrine of hell raises for religious belief. In addition, there is an account of the kinds of strategies that can be used in order to solve the problem of hell. It is argued that despite strong similarities between the problem of evil and the problem of hell, certain solutions for solving the problem of evil are not appropriate for solving the problem of hell. It is claimed that only by providing a defensible theory of the nature of hell can the problem of hell be adequately dealt with. Brief accounts are given of various theories of hell including the self-determination, deterrent, reformatory, and quarantine theories.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationMasters
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    DOIs
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2002

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