Twenty-four-hour profiles of metabolic and stress hormones in sheep selected for a calm or nervous temperament

Stacey Rietema, Margaret Blackberry, Shane Maloney, Graeme Martin, Penny Hawken, Dominique Blache

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Even in the absence of stressors, temperament is associated with changes in the concentration of stress-responsive hormones and, possibly because of such changes, temperament can affect metabolism. We tested whether, in sheep bred for temperament for 14 generations, "nervous" females have greater concentrations of stress-responsive hormones in the absence of stressors than "calm" females, and whether these differences are associated with changes in the concentrations of metabolic hormones. In resting "calm" (n = 8) and "nervous" (n = 8) sheep, concentrations of cortisol, prolactin, leptin, and insulin were measured in blood plasma sampled via jugular catheter every 20 min for 24 h. The animals were individually penned, habituated to their housing and human handling over 7 wk, and fed before sampling began. Diurnal variation was evident for all hormones, but a 24-h cortisol pattern was detected in only 7 individuals. There was no effect of temperament on any aspect of concentrations of cortisol or prolactin, but "calm" animals had greater concentrations of insulin in the early afternoon than "nervous" animals (14.5 ± 1.1 vs 10.0 ± 1.6 μU/mL; P = 0.038), and a similar tendency was seen for leptin (P = 0.092). We conclude that selection for temperament affects the concentration of metabolic hormones in the absence of stressors, but this effect is independent of stress-responsive hormones.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)78-87
JournalDomestic Animal Endocrinology
Volume53
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

temperament
Physiological Stress
Temperament
Sheep
hormones
Hormones
sheep
cortisol
Hydrocortisone
Leptin
prolactin
leptin
Prolactin
insulin
Insulin
animals
sheep breeds
diurnal variation
blood plasma
catheters

Cite this

@article{9a919e9bc1dc4b0e91c5ad08ce17483c,
title = "Twenty-four-hour profiles of metabolic and stress hormones in sheep selected for a calm or nervous temperament",
abstract = "{\circledC} 2015 Elsevier Inc. Even in the absence of stressors, temperament is associated with changes in the concentration of stress-responsive hormones and, possibly because of such changes, temperament can affect metabolism. We tested whether, in sheep bred for temperament for 14 generations, {"}nervous{"} females have greater concentrations of stress-responsive hormones in the absence of stressors than {"}calm{"} females, and whether these differences are associated with changes in the concentrations of metabolic hormones. In resting {"}calm{"} (n = 8) and {"}nervous{"} (n = 8) sheep, concentrations of cortisol, prolactin, leptin, and insulin were measured in blood plasma sampled via jugular catheter every 20 min for 24 h. The animals were individually penned, habituated to their housing and human handling over 7 wk, and fed before sampling began. Diurnal variation was evident for all hormones, but a 24-h cortisol pattern was detected in only 7 individuals. There was no effect of temperament on any aspect of concentrations of cortisol or prolactin, but {"}calm{"} animals had greater concentrations of insulin in the early afternoon than {"}nervous{"} animals (14.5 ± 1.1 vs 10.0 ± 1.6 μU/mL; P = 0.038), and a similar tendency was seen for leptin (P = 0.092). We conclude that selection for temperament affects the concentration of metabolic hormones in the absence of stressors, but this effect is independent of stress-responsive hormones.",
author = "Stacey Rietema and Margaret Blackberry and Shane Maloney and Graeme Martin and Penny Hawken and Dominique Blache",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.domaniend.2015.05.005",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "78--87",
journal = "Domestic Animal Endocrinology",
issn = "0739-7240",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

Twenty-four-hour profiles of metabolic and stress hormones in sheep selected for a calm or nervous temperament. / Rietema, Stacey; Blackberry, Margaret; Maloney, Shane; Martin, Graeme; Hawken, Penny; Blache, Dominique.

In: Domestic Animal Endocrinology, Vol. 53, 2015, p. 78-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Twenty-four-hour profiles of metabolic and stress hormones in sheep selected for a calm or nervous temperament

AU - Rietema, Stacey

AU - Blackberry, Margaret

AU - Maloney, Shane

AU - Martin, Graeme

AU - Hawken, Penny

AU - Blache, Dominique

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - © 2015 Elsevier Inc. Even in the absence of stressors, temperament is associated with changes in the concentration of stress-responsive hormones and, possibly because of such changes, temperament can affect metabolism. We tested whether, in sheep bred for temperament for 14 generations, "nervous" females have greater concentrations of stress-responsive hormones in the absence of stressors than "calm" females, and whether these differences are associated with changes in the concentrations of metabolic hormones. In resting "calm" (n = 8) and "nervous" (n = 8) sheep, concentrations of cortisol, prolactin, leptin, and insulin were measured in blood plasma sampled via jugular catheter every 20 min for 24 h. The animals were individually penned, habituated to their housing and human handling over 7 wk, and fed before sampling began. Diurnal variation was evident for all hormones, but a 24-h cortisol pattern was detected in only 7 individuals. There was no effect of temperament on any aspect of concentrations of cortisol or prolactin, but "calm" animals had greater concentrations of insulin in the early afternoon than "nervous" animals (14.5 ± 1.1 vs 10.0 ± 1.6 μU/mL; P = 0.038), and a similar tendency was seen for leptin (P = 0.092). We conclude that selection for temperament affects the concentration of metabolic hormones in the absence of stressors, but this effect is independent of stress-responsive hormones.

AB - © 2015 Elsevier Inc. Even in the absence of stressors, temperament is associated with changes in the concentration of stress-responsive hormones and, possibly because of such changes, temperament can affect metabolism. We tested whether, in sheep bred for temperament for 14 generations, "nervous" females have greater concentrations of stress-responsive hormones in the absence of stressors than "calm" females, and whether these differences are associated with changes in the concentrations of metabolic hormones. In resting "calm" (n = 8) and "nervous" (n = 8) sheep, concentrations of cortisol, prolactin, leptin, and insulin were measured in blood plasma sampled via jugular catheter every 20 min for 24 h. The animals were individually penned, habituated to their housing and human handling over 7 wk, and fed before sampling began. Diurnal variation was evident for all hormones, but a 24-h cortisol pattern was detected in only 7 individuals. There was no effect of temperament on any aspect of concentrations of cortisol or prolactin, but "calm" animals had greater concentrations of insulin in the early afternoon than "nervous" animals (14.5 ± 1.1 vs 10.0 ± 1.6 μU/mL; P = 0.038), and a similar tendency was seen for leptin (P = 0.092). We conclude that selection for temperament affects the concentration of metabolic hormones in the absence of stressors, but this effect is independent of stress-responsive hormones.

U2 - 10.1016/j.domaniend.2015.05.005

DO - 10.1016/j.domaniend.2015.05.005

M3 - Article

VL - 53

SP - 78

EP - 87

JO - Domestic Animal Endocrinology

JF - Domestic Animal Endocrinology

SN - 0739-7240

ER -