Triticum aestivum shows a greater biomass response to a supply of aluminium phosphate than Lupinus albus, despite releasing fewer carboxylates into the rhizosphere

Stuart Pearse, Erik Veneklaas, Greg Cawthray, Michael Bolland, Hans Lambers

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    68 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The relationship between carboxylate release and the ability of plants to access phosphorus from AIPO(4) and to detoxify aluminium was studied by comparing species with a low and high rate of carboxylate release, Triticum aestivum ( wheat) and Lupinus albus ( white lupin), respectively.Species were supplied with P at 10, 20, 40 or 100 mg P kg(-1) sand in the form of sparingly soluble AIPO(4) or soluble KH2PO4; control plants did not receive any P.Triticum aestivum was significantly better than L. albus at accessing P from AIPO(4), despite accumulating fewer carboxylates in its rhizosphere. Rhizosphere pH of L. albus did not vary with form or level of P supply, while the rhizosphere pH of T. aestivum increased with the level of P supplied.Based on the evidence in the present study, a model is proposed to explain the poor performance of L. albus, whereby the release of carboxylates and associated protons reduces the chelating ability of exuded carboxylates, thus reducing P acquisition and increasing Al toxicity.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)515-524
    JournalNew Phytologist
    Volume169
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

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