Trends in mental health related contacts among mothers of Aboriginal children in Western Australia (1990-2013): A linked data population-based cohort study of over 40 000 children

Fernando Lima, Carrington Shepherd, Janice Wong, Melissa O'donnell, Rhonda Marriott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective This study examines the scale of maternal mental health related contacts among Australian Aboriginal children over time, and associations with socio-economic characteristics, geographical remoteness and maternal age. Design A retrospective cohort study of the prevalence of maternal mental health related contacts among Aboriginal children born in Western Australia between 1990 and 2013. Setting Population of Western Australia with de-identified linked administrative data from the Western Australian Department of Health. Participants All Aboriginal children born in Western Australia between 1990 and 2013 and their mothers. Primary outcome measure Prevalence of maternal mental health related contacts among Aboriginal children born between 1990 and 2013. Mental health related contacts were identified using mental health related inpatient hospitalisations and outpatient contacts. Results Almost 30% of cohort children were born to a mother with at least one mental health contact in the 5 years prior to birth, with 15% reported in the year prior to birth and the year post birth. There was a distinct increase in the prevalence of maternal mental health contacts between 1990 and 2013 (4-5% per year, with a peak in 2007). Maternal mental health contacts were associated with living in more disadvantaged areas and major cities, and having a mother aged over 20 years at birth. Conclusions The study affirms that mental health issues place a considerable burden on Aboriginal Australia, and suggests that many of the mental health issues that women develop earlier in life are chronic at the time of conception, during pregnancy and at birth. Early intervention and support for women in the earliest stages of family planning are required to alleviate the burden of mental health problems at birth and after birth. There is a clear need for policies on the development of a holistic healthcare model, with a multisector approach, offering culturally appropriate services for Aboriginal people.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere027733
JournalBMJ Open
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2019

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Western Australia
Mental Health
Cohort Studies
Mothers
Population
Parturition
Policy Making
Maternal Age
Family Planning Services
Vulnerable Populations
Inpatients
Hospitalization
Outpatients
Retrospective Studies
Economics
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Maternal Health

Cite this

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title = "Trends in mental health related contacts among mothers of Aboriginal children in Western Australia (1990-2013): A linked data population-based cohort study of over 40 000 children",
abstract = "Objective This study examines the scale of maternal mental health related contacts among Australian Aboriginal children over time, and associations with socio-economic characteristics, geographical remoteness and maternal age. Design A retrospective cohort study of the prevalence of maternal mental health related contacts among Aboriginal children born in Western Australia between 1990 and 2013. Setting Population of Western Australia with de-identified linked administrative data from the Western Australian Department of Health. Participants All Aboriginal children born in Western Australia between 1990 and 2013 and their mothers. Primary outcome measure Prevalence of maternal mental health related contacts among Aboriginal children born between 1990 and 2013. Mental health related contacts were identified using mental health related inpatient hospitalisations and outpatient contacts. Results Almost 30{\%} of cohort children were born to a mother with at least one mental health contact in the 5 years prior to birth, with 15{\%} reported in the year prior to birth and the year post birth. There was a distinct increase in the prevalence of maternal mental health contacts between 1990 and 2013 (4-5{\%} per year, with a peak in 2007). Maternal mental health contacts were associated with living in more disadvantaged areas and major cities, and having a mother aged over 20 years at birth. Conclusions The study affirms that mental health issues place a considerable burden on Aboriginal Australia, and suggests that many of the mental health issues that women develop earlier in life are chronic at the time of conception, during pregnancy and at birth. Early intervention and support for women in the earliest stages of family planning are required to alleviate the burden of mental health problems at birth and after birth. There is a clear need for policies on the development of a holistic healthcare model, with a multisector approach, offering culturally appropriate services for Aboriginal people.",
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Trends in mental health related contacts among mothers of Aboriginal children in Western Australia (1990-2013) : A linked data population-based cohort study of over 40 000 children. / Lima, Fernando; Shepherd, Carrington; Wong, Janice; O'donnell, Melissa; Marriott, Rhonda.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 9, No. 7, e027733, 01.06.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trends in mental health related contacts among mothers of Aboriginal children in Western Australia (1990-2013)

T2 - A linked data population-based cohort study of over 40 000 children

AU - Lima, Fernando

AU - Shepherd, Carrington

AU - Wong, Janice

AU - O'donnell, Melissa

AU - Marriott, Rhonda

PY - 2019/6/1

Y1 - 2019/6/1

N2 - Objective This study examines the scale of maternal mental health related contacts among Australian Aboriginal children over time, and associations with socio-economic characteristics, geographical remoteness and maternal age. Design A retrospective cohort study of the prevalence of maternal mental health related contacts among Aboriginal children born in Western Australia between 1990 and 2013. Setting Population of Western Australia with de-identified linked administrative data from the Western Australian Department of Health. Participants All Aboriginal children born in Western Australia between 1990 and 2013 and their mothers. Primary outcome measure Prevalence of maternal mental health related contacts among Aboriginal children born between 1990 and 2013. Mental health related contacts were identified using mental health related inpatient hospitalisations and outpatient contacts. Results Almost 30% of cohort children were born to a mother with at least one mental health contact in the 5 years prior to birth, with 15% reported in the year prior to birth and the year post birth. There was a distinct increase in the prevalence of maternal mental health contacts between 1990 and 2013 (4-5% per year, with a peak in 2007). Maternal mental health contacts were associated with living in more disadvantaged areas and major cities, and having a mother aged over 20 years at birth. Conclusions The study affirms that mental health issues place a considerable burden on Aboriginal Australia, and suggests that many of the mental health issues that women develop earlier in life are chronic at the time of conception, during pregnancy and at birth. Early intervention and support for women in the earliest stages of family planning are required to alleviate the burden of mental health problems at birth and after birth. There is a clear need for policies on the development of a holistic healthcare model, with a multisector approach, offering culturally appropriate services for Aboriginal people.

AB - Objective This study examines the scale of maternal mental health related contacts among Australian Aboriginal children over time, and associations with socio-economic characteristics, geographical remoteness and maternal age. Design A retrospective cohort study of the prevalence of maternal mental health related contacts among Aboriginal children born in Western Australia between 1990 and 2013. Setting Population of Western Australia with de-identified linked administrative data from the Western Australian Department of Health. Participants All Aboriginal children born in Western Australia between 1990 and 2013 and their mothers. Primary outcome measure Prevalence of maternal mental health related contacts among Aboriginal children born between 1990 and 2013. Mental health related contacts were identified using mental health related inpatient hospitalisations and outpatient contacts. Results Almost 30% of cohort children were born to a mother with at least one mental health contact in the 5 years prior to birth, with 15% reported in the year prior to birth and the year post birth. There was a distinct increase in the prevalence of maternal mental health contacts between 1990 and 2013 (4-5% per year, with a peak in 2007). Maternal mental health contacts were associated with living in more disadvantaged areas and major cities, and having a mother aged over 20 years at birth. Conclusions The study affirms that mental health issues place a considerable burden on Aboriginal Australia, and suggests that many of the mental health issues that women develop earlier in life are chronic at the time of conception, during pregnancy and at birth. Early intervention and support for women in the earliest stages of family planning are required to alleviate the burden of mental health problems at birth and after birth. There is a clear need for policies on the development of a holistic healthcare model, with a multisector approach, offering culturally appropriate services for Aboriginal people.

KW - Aboriginal

KW - Hospitalisations

KW - Indigenous

KW - Linked administrative data

KW - Maternal health

KW - Mental health

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DO - 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-027733

M3 - Article

VL - 9

JO - BMJ (Open)

JF - BMJ (Open)

SN - 2044-6055

IS - 7

M1 - e027733

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