Trends in incidence and prevalence of hospitalization for atrial fibrillation and associated mortality in Western Australia, 1995-2010

Tom Briffa, Joe Hung, Matthew Knuiman, Brendan Mcquillan, D.P. Chew, J. Eikelboom, Graeme Hankey, Katherine Teng, Lee Nedkoff, Rukshen Weerasooriya, Andrew Liu, P. Stobie

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Abstract

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Objective Hospitalization for atrial fibrillation (AF) is a large and growing public health problem. We examined current trends in the incidence, prevalence, and associated mortality of first-ever hospitalization for AF. Methods Linked hospital admission data were used to identify all Western Australia residents aged 35-84 years with prevalent AF and incident (first-ever) hospitalization for AF as a principal or secondary diagnosis during 1995-2010. Results There were 57,552 incident hospitalizations, mean age 69.8 years, with 41.4% women. Over the calendar periods, age- and sex-standardized incidence of hospitalization for AF as any diagnosis declined annually by 1.1% (95% CI; 0.93, 1.29), while incident AF as a principal diagnosis increased annually by 1.2% (95% CI; 0.84, 1.50). Incident AF hospitalization was higher among men than women, and 15-fold higher in the 75-84 compared with 35-64 year age group. The age- and sex-standardized prevalence of AF increased annually by 2.0% (95% CI; 1.88, 2.03) over the same period. Comorbidity trends were mixed with diabetes and valvular heart disease increasing, and hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease decreasing. The 1-year all-cause mortality after incident AF hospitalization declined from 17.6% to 14.6% (trend P <0.001), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.86 (95% CI; 0.81, 0.91). Conclusion This contemporary study shows that incident AF hospitalization is not increasing except for AF as a principal diagnosis, while population prevalence of hospitalized AF has risen substantially. The high 1-year mortality following incident AF hospitalization has improved only modestly over the recent period.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-25
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Cardiology
Volume208
Early online date28 Jan 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2016

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Western Australia
Atrial Fibrillation
Hospitalization
Mortality
Incidence
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Heart Valve Diseases
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Ireland
Comorbidity
Coronary Artery Disease

Cite this

@article{bebbabacf87c4afbb1ddd069563ed5a9,
title = "Trends in incidence and prevalence of hospitalization for atrial fibrillation and associated mortality in Western Australia, 1995-2010",
abstract = "{\circledC} 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Objective Hospitalization for atrial fibrillation (AF) is a large and growing public health problem. We examined current trends in the incidence, prevalence, and associated mortality of first-ever hospitalization for AF. Methods Linked hospital admission data were used to identify all Western Australia residents aged 35-84 years with prevalent AF and incident (first-ever) hospitalization for AF as a principal or secondary diagnosis during 1995-2010. Results There were 57,552 incident hospitalizations, mean age 69.8 years, with 41.4{\%} women. Over the calendar periods, age- and sex-standardized incidence of hospitalization for AF as any diagnosis declined annually by 1.1{\%} (95{\%} CI; 0.93, 1.29), while incident AF as a principal diagnosis increased annually by 1.2{\%} (95{\%} CI; 0.84, 1.50). Incident AF hospitalization was higher among men than women, and 15-fold higher in the 75-84 compared with 35-64 year age group. The age- and sex-standardized prevalence of AF increased annually by 2.0{\%} (95{\%} CI; 1.88, 2.03) over the same period. Comorbidity trends were mixed with diabetes and valvular heart disease increasing, and hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease decreasing. The 1-year all-cause mortality after incident AF hospitalization declined from 17.6{\%} to 14.6{\%} (trend P <0.001), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.86 (95{\%} CI; 0.81, 0.91). Conclusion This contemporary study shows that incident AF hospitalization is not increasing except for AF as a principal diagnosis, while population prevalence of hospitalized AF has risen substantially. The high 1-year mortality following incident AF hospitalization has improved only modestly over the recent period.",
author = "Tom Briffa and Joe Hung and Matthew Knuiman and Brendan Mcquillan and D.P. Chew and J. Eikelboom and Graeme Hankey and Katherine Teng and Lee Nedkoff and Rukshen Weerasooriya and Andrew Liu and P. Stobie",
year = "2016",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.01.196",
language = "English",
volume = "208",
pages = "19--25",
journal = "International Journal of Cardiology",
issn = "0167-5273",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trends in incidence and prevalence of hospitalization for atrial fibrillation and associated mortality in Western Australia, 1995-2010

AU - Briffa, Tom

AU - Hung, Joe

AU - Knuiman, Matthew

AU - Mcquillan, Brendan

AU - Chew, D.P.

AU - Eikelboom, J.

AU - Hankey, Graeme

AU - Teng, Katherine

AU - Nedkoff, Lee

AU - Weerasooriya, Rukshen

AU - Liu, Andrew

AU - Stobie, P.

PY - 2016/4/1

Y1 - 2016/4/1

N2 - © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Objective Hospitalization for atrial fibrillation (AF) is a large and growing public health problem. We examined current trends in the incidence, prevalence, and associated mortality of first-ever hospitalization for AF. Methods Linked hospital admission data were used to identify all Western Australia residents aged 35-84 years with prevalent AF and incident (first-ever) hospitalization for AF as a principal or secondary diagnosis during 1995-2010. Results There were 57,552 incident hospitalizations, mean age 69.8 years, with 41.4% women. Over the calendar periods, age- and sex-standardized incidence of hospitalization for AF as any diagnosis declined annually by 1.1% (95% CI; 0.93, 1.29), while incident AF as a principal diagnosis increased annually by 1.2% (95% CI; 0.84, 1.50). Incident AF hospitalization was higher among men than women, and 15-fold higher in the 75-84 compared with 35-64 year age group. The age- and sex-standardized prevalence of AF increased annually by 2.0% (95% CI; 1.88, 2.03) over the same period. Comorbidity trends were mixed with diabetes and valvular heart disease increasing, and hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease decreasing. The 1-year all-cause mortality after incident AF hospitalization declined from 17.6% to 14.6% (trend P <0.001), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.86 (95% CI; 0.81, 0.91). Conclusion This contemporary study shows that incident AF hospitalization is not increasing except for AF as a principal diagnosis, while population prevalence of hospitalized AF has risen substantially. The high 1-year mortality following incident AF hospitalization has improved only modestly over the recent period.

AB - © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Objective Hospitalization for atrial fibrillation (AF) is a large and growing public health problem. We examined current trends in the incidence, prevalence, and associated mortality of first-ever hospitalization for AF. Methods Linked hospital admission data were used to identify all Western Australia residents aged 35-84 years with prevalent AF and incident (first-ever) hospitalization for AF as a principal or secondary diagnosis during 1995-2010. Results There were 57,552 incident hospitalizations, mean age 69.8 years, with 41.4% women. Over the calendar periods, age- and sex-standardized incidence of hospitalization for AF as any diagnosis declined annually by 1.1% (95% CI; 0.93, 1.29), while incident AF as a principal diagnosis increased annually by 1.2% (95% CI; 0.84, 1.50). Incident AF hospitalization was higher among men than women, and 15-fold higher in the 75-84 compared with 35-64 year age group. The age- and sex-standardized prevalence of AF increased annually by 2.0% (95% CI; 1.88, 2.03) over the same period. Comorbidity trends were mixed with diabetes and valvular heart disease increasing, and hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease decreasing. The 1-year all-cause mortality after incident AF hospitalization declined from 17.6% to 14.6% (trend P <0.001), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.86 (95% CI; 0.81, 0.91). Conclusion This contemporary study shows that incident AF hospitalization is not increasing except for AF as a principal diagnosis, while population prevalence of hospitalized AF has risen substantially. The high 1-year mortality following incident AF hospitalization has improved only modestly over the recent period.

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.01.196

DO - 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.01.196

M3 - Article

VL - 208

SP - 19

EP - 25

JO - International Journal of Cardiology

JF - International Journal of Cardiology

SN - 0167-5273

ER -