Traumatic spinal cord injuries: A retrospective cohort study of children seen in Western Australia between 1996 and 2016

Rachel Dwyer, Roslyn Ward, Emma Richardson, Sue Anne Davidson, Anna Thetford, Jane Valentine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: To describe the medical complexity of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) in paediatric patients in Western Australia (WA). Secondly, to determine if Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH) for Children (the tertiary paediatric centre in WA where all TSCI patients are managed) is meeting the requirements of the Australasian Rehabilitation Outcomes Centre (AROC) paediatric rehabilitation minimum data set gathered on each patient. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study of patients seen at PMH between 1996-2016. The AROC minimum dataset information data were gathered on each patient. Functional status and rehabilitation outcomes were assessed using Functional Independence Measure for Children (weeFIM), Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), and Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS). Patient complexity was captured by documenting the specialty teams involved, the number of readmissions, and the International Statistical Classification of Disease and Related Health Problems Z codes. RESULTS: Data from 19 patients (13 males, age range 6 months-15 years; 6 females, age range 4 years-13 years) were available. There were 10 cervical TSCIs with a median length of stay of 213 days and 9 thoracic TSCIs with a median length of stay of 49 days. Patients had between zero and six comorbidities prior to their TSCI. CONCLUSIONS: Children with medical complexity are responsive to rehabilitation but have a high burden of care, requiring multiple-specialty care and hospital re-admissions. AROC has set a minimum data set recommendation for the collection and examination of patient data. PMH meets the AROC guidelines for patient data collection and descriptive analyses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)235-243
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Sep 2019

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