Tracing a tradition of the literary Gothic in Australian women's fiction and film narratives

Naomi Britten

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

[Truncated] This thesis seeks to establish a tradition of the Gothic genre in selected fiction and film narratives by Australian women writers, ranging from the beginning of the twentieth-century to the present day. The central argument is that the texts chosen for discussion incorporate a constellation of Gothic thematic concerns which are specific to the Australian cultural and social context and which also reflect female subjectivity in a way that extends the traditional concerns of the genre. This study explores the extent to which the chosen works seek to challenge or reinforce dominant social, cultural, racial and political ideologies in Australia, which traditionally privilege a white masculinist paradigm. One of the key ideas explored is how Australian women writers re-imagine dominant Australian mythologies and narratives, through their engagement with the literary Gothic, to contribute to a dialogue on national identity.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Gothic
Fiction
Women Writers
Political Ideology
Constellation
Cultural Context
Mythology
Female Subjectivity
Thematic
National Identity
Paradigm
Privilege
Social Context

Bibliographical note

This thesis has been made available in the UWA Profiles and Research Repository as part of a UWA Library project to digitise and make available theses completed before 2003. If you are the author of this thesis and would like it removed from the UWA Profiles and Research Repository, please contact digitaltheses-lib@uwa.edu.au

Cite this

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title = "Tracing a tradition of the literary Gothic in Australian women's fiction and film narratives",
abstract = "[Truncated] This thesis seeks to establish a tradition of the Gothic genre in selected fiction and film narratives by Australian women writers, ranging from the beginning of the twentieth-century to the present day. The central argument is that the texts chosen for discussion incorporate a constellation of Gothic thematic concerns which are specific to the Australian cultural and social context and which also reflect female subjectivity in a way that extends the traditional concerns of the genre. This study explores the extent to which the chosen works seek to challenge or reinforce dominant social, cultural, racial and political ideologies in Australia, which traditionally privilege a white masculinist paradigm. One of the key ideas explored is how Australian women writers re-imagine dominant Australian mythologies and narratives, through their engagement with the literary Gothic, to contribute to a dialogue on national identity.",
author = "Naomi Britten",
note = "This thesis has been made available in the UWA Profiles and Research Repository as part of a UWA Library project to digitise and make available theses completed before 2003. If you are the author of this thesis and would like it removed from the UWA Profiles and Research Repository, please contact digitaltheses-lib@uwa.edu.au",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.26182/5d5249e8162f1",
language = "English",
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Tracing a tradition of the literary Gothic in Australian women's fiction and film narratives. / Britten, Naomi.

2008.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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AU - Britten, Naomi

N1 - This thesis has been made available in the UWA Profiles and Research Repository as part of a UWA Library project to digitise and make available theses completed before 2003. If you are the author of this thesis and would like it removed from the UWA Profiles and Research Repository, please contact digitaltheses-lib@uwa.edu.au

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - [Truncated] This thesis seeks to establish a tradition of the Gothic genre in selected fiction and film narratives by Australian women writers, ranging from the beginning of the twentieth-century to the present day. The central argument is that the texts chosen for discussion incorporate a constellation of Gothic thematic concerns which are specific to the Australian cultural and social context and which also reflect female subjectivity in a way that extends the traditional concerns of the genre. This study explores the extent to which the chosen works seek to challenge or reinforce dominant social, cultural, racial and political ideologies in Australia, which traditionally privilege a white masculinist paradigm. One of the key ideas explored is how Australian women writers re-imagine dominant Australian mythologies and narratives, through their engagement with the literary Gothic, to contribute to a dialogue on national identity.

AB - [Truncated] This thesis seeks to establish a tradition of the Gothic genre in selected fiction and film narratives by Australian women writers, ranging from the beginning of the twentieth-century to the present day. The central argument is that the texts chosen for discussion incorporate a constellation of Gothic thematic concerns which are specific to the Australian cultural and social context and which also reflect female subjectivity in a way that extends the traditional concerns of the genre. This study explores the extent to which the chosen works seek to challenge or reinforce dominant social, cultural, racial and political ideologies in Australia, which traditionally privilege a white masculinist paradigm. One of the key ideas explored is how Australian women writers re-imagine dominant Australian mythologies and narratives, through their engagement with the literary Gothic, to contribute to a dialogue on national identity.

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DO - 10.26182/5d5249e8162f1

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

ER -