Traceability systems in the Western Australia halal food supply chain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the emergence and implementation of traceability systems in the Western Australian (WA) Halal food industry. In particular, to understand how individuals in facilitating organizations perceive the Halal idea logic and the benefits that a traceability system can provide to the Halal food processing industry. Design/methodology/approach – An empirical qualitative approach was employed to examine these issues utilizing in-depth interviews. Thematic analysis was carried out using Leximancer software. Findings – Findings suggest that individual’s perception of Halal idea logic is aligned to the roles they perform. These perceptions were impacted by the specific objectives or business interests of each organization. Facilitating organizations also perceive that traceability systems are a strategic tool in the Halal food processing industry. Practical implications – The research provides insights into how to improve existing understanding of the Halal idea logic within Halal food business networks and the benefits of implementing traceability systems in Halal food production. Joint activity between firms creates a network effect, where the value created is greater than that which the firms alone can create. Originality/value – Though traceability systems have become increasingly popular in the food industry, little research has been undertaken to understand how individuals in facilitating organizations perceive these systems, particularly in the growing Halal food industry. Hence, the study contributes to the literature of traceability studies and the area of change and process adaptation in business relationships in the context of halal food production.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)324-348
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Supply chain
Western Australia
Food supply
Traceability
Logic
Food industry
Food processing industry
Food production
Qualitative approaches
Business networks
Food
Network effects
In-depth interviews
Individual perception
Software
Business relationships
Thematic analysis
Design methodology

Cite this

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title = "Traceability systems in the Western Australia halal food supply chain",
abstract = "{\circledC} Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the emergence and implementation of traceability systems in the Western Australian (WA) Halal food industry. In particular, to understand how individuals in facilitating organizations perceive the Halal idea logic and the benefits that a traceability system can provide to the Halal food processing industry. Design/methodology/approach – An empirical qualitative approach was employed to examine these issues utilizing in-depth interviews. Thematic analysis was carried out using Leximancer software. Findings – Findings suggest that individual’s perception of Halal idea logic is aligned to the roles they perform. These perceptions were impacted by the specific objectives or business interests of each organization. Facilitating organizations also perceive that traceability systems are a strategic tool in the Halal food processing industry. Practical implications – The research provides insights into how to improve existing understanding of the Halal idea logic within Halal food business networks and the benefits of implementing traceability systems in Halal food production. Joint activity between firms creates a network effect, where the value created is greater than that which the firms alone can create. Originality/value – Though traceability systems have become increasingly popular in the food industry, little research has been undertaken to understand how individuals in facilitating organizations perceive these systems, particularly in the growing Halal food industry. Hence, the study contributes to the literature of traceability studies and the area of change and process adaptation in business relationships in the context of halal food production.",
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Traceability systems in the Western Australia halal food supply chain. / Poniman, Delma; Purchase, Sharon; Sneddon, Joanne.

In: Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, Vol. 27, No. 2, 2015, p. 324-348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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