Towards personalised public warnings: harnessing technological advancements to promote better individual decision-making in the face of disasters

Yinghui Cao, Bryan J. Boruff, Ilona M. McNeill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Official warnings are essential for informing the public of impending hazards and promoting their responses before a disaster occurs. However, research has identified that traditional public warnings, such as generic text messages based on large geographic regions, often fail to promote appropriate responses by at-risk residents. Recently, there has been an increased focus on using map-based approaches for communicating public warnings. However, a systematic framework to guide the design of effective mapping instruments for this purpose is lacking. The researchers sought to fill this gap by merging the scholarly understanding of factors influencing warning effectiveness with the contemporary spatial capacities of the emergency management sector. The current paper presents the conceptual framework resulting from this merger, which can be used to direct the design and implementation of map-based warnings that offer personalised risk visualisation and provide personalised decision support to motivate appropriate responses. An example is then provided to illustrate how this framework can be applied for the development of personalised bushfire warnings in an Australian context. Underpinned by webGIS technologies, the proposed framework shows a potentially ground-breaking approach to improve public warning communication by fostering more efficient and effective risk personalisation and response related decision-making by individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1231-1252
Number of pages22
JournalInternational Journal of Digital Earth
Volume10
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Dec 2017

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