Touching with the eye: Science films, embodied technology and nanoscientific data

Andrea Rassell, Jonathan Duckworth

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

Abstract

Science filmmakers have created new forms of image-based scientific data through techniques, such as stop-motion and time-lapse, predominantly using optical instrumentation. These tech-niques enable direct observation via the lenses of cameras and microscopes without further augmenting the human senses. However, these optical techniques cannot capture suprasen-sible phenomena – those that cannot be directly perceived without further translation. Observ-ing these phenomena must be technologically mediated on multiple levels via instrumentation, hardware and software, effectively disrupting the filmmaker’s experience of embodied technol-ogy, a crucial aspect of cinematographic practice. We speculate how to incorporate embodied technology that will enable filmmakers to depict suprasensible phenomena of nanoscale envi-ronments in experimental media works. This short paper details our practical experiments and experience with audio, visual and tactile representations of nano-data.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Electronic Visualisation and the Arts Australasia 2016 Conference
EditorsSam Hinton
Place of PublicationCanberra
PublisherFaculty of Arts and Design, University of Canberra
Pages62-66
ISBN (Print)978-1-74088-463-1
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes
EventElectronic Visualisation and the Arts Australasia Conference - University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia
Duration: 4 Mar 20166 Mar 2016

Conference

ConferenceElectronic Visualisation and the Arts Australasia Conference
Abbreviated titleEVAA 2016
CountryAustralia
CityCanberra
Period4/03/166/03/16

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