Tolerance to partial and complete submergence in the forage legume Melilotus siculus: an evaluation of 15 accessions for petiole hyponastic response and gas-filled spaces, leaf hydrophobicity and gas films, and root phellem

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Abstract

Background and Aims
Submergence is a severe stress for most plants. Melilotus siculus is a waterlogging- (i.e. root zone hypoxia) tolerant annual forage legume, but data were lacking for the effects of partial and full submergence of the shoots. The aim was to compare the tolerance to partial and full submergence of 15 M. siculus accessions and to assess variation in traits possibly contributing to tolerance. Recovery ability post-submergence was also evaluated.
Methods
A factorial experiment imposed treatments of water level [aerated root zone with shoots in air as controls, stagnant root zone with shoots in air, stagnant root zone with partial (75 %) or full shoot submergence] on 15 accessions, for 7 d on 4-week-old plants in a 20/15 °C day/night phytotron. Measurements included: shoot and root growth, hyponastic petiole responses, petiole gas-filled spaces, leaflet sugars, leaflet surface hydrophobicity, leaflet gas film thickness and phellem area near the base of the main root. Recovery following full submergence was also assessed.
Key Results
Accessions differed in shoot and root growth during partial and full shoot submergence. Traits differing among accessions and associated with tolerance were leaflet gas film thickness upon submergence, gas-filled spaces in petioles and phellem tissue area near the base of the main root. All accessions were able to re-orientate petioles towards the vertical under both partial and full submergence. Petiole extension rates were maintained during partial submergence, but decreased during full submergence. Leaflet sugars accumulated during partial submergence, but were depleted during full submergence. Growth resumption after full submergence differed among accessions and was positively correlated with the number of green leaves retained at desubmergence.
Conclusions
Melilotus siculus is able to tolerate partial and full submergence of at least 7 d. Leaflet surface hydrophobicity and associated gas film retention, petiole gas-filled porosity and root phellem abundance are important traits contributing to tolerance. Post-submergence recovery growth differs among accessions. The ability to retain green leaves is essential to succeed during recovery.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages12
JournalAnnals of Botany
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 16 Aug 2018

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Melilotus siculus
periderm
submergence
forage legumes
hydrophobicity
films (materials)
gases
leaves
shoots
rhizosphere
petioles
root growth
sugars

Cite this

@article{30af48914fb14d70a704696348ad0e34,
title = "Tolerance to partial and complete submergence in the forage legume Melilotus siculus: an evaluation of 15 accessions for petiole hyponastic response and gas-filled spaces, leaf hydrophobicity and gas films, and root phellem",
abstract = "Background and AimsSubmergence is a severe stress for most plants. Melilotus siculus is a waterlogging- (i.e. root zone hypoxia) tolerant annual forage legume, but data were lacking for the effects of partial and full submergence of the shoots. The aim was to compare the tolerance to partial and full submergence of 15 M. siculus accessions and to assess variation in traits possibly contributing to tolerance. Recovery ability post-submergence was also evaluated.MethodsA factorial experiment imposed treatments of water level [aerated root zone with shoots in air as controls, stagnant root zone with shoots in air, stagnant root zone with partial (75 {\%}) or full shoot submergence] on 15 accessions, for 7 d on 4-week-old plants in a 20/15 °C day/night phytotron. Measurements included: shoot and root growth, hyponastic petiole responses, petiole gas-filled spaces, leaflet sugars, leaflet surface hydrophobicity, leaflet gas film thickness and phellem area near the base of the main root. Recovery following full submergence was also assessed.Key ResultsAccessions differed in shoot and root growth during partial and full shoot submergence. Traits differing among accessions and associated with tolerance were leaflet gas film thickness upon submergence, gas-filled spaces in petioles and phellem tissue area near the base of the main root. All accessions were able to re-orientate petioles towards the vertical under both partial and full submergence. Petiole extension rates were maintained during partial submergence, but decreased during full submergence. Leaflet sugars accumulated during partial submergence, but were depleted during full submergence. Growth resumption after full submergence differed among accessions and was positively correlated with the number of green leaves retained at desubmergence.ConclusionsMelilotus siculus is able to tolerate partial and full submergence of at least 7 d. Leaflet surface hydrophobicity and associated gas film retention, petiole gas-filled porosity and root phellem abundance are important traits contributing to tolerance. Post-submergence recovery growth differs among accessions. The ability to retain green leaves is essential to succeed during recovery.",
author = "Gustavo Striker and Lukasz Kotula and Timothy Colmer",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "16",
doi = "10.1093/aob/mcy153",
language = "English",
journal = "Annals of Botany",
issn = "0305-7364",
publisher = "OXFORD UNIV PRESS UNITED KINGDOM",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tolerance to partial and complete submergence in the forage legume Melilotus siculus: an evaluation of 15 accessions for petiole hyponastic response and gas-filled spaces, leaf hydrophobicity and gas films, and root phellem

AU - Striker, Gustavo

AU - Kotula, Lukasz

AU - Colmer, Timothy

PY - 2018/8/16

Y1 - 2018/8/16

N2 - Background and AimsSubmergence is a severe stress for most plants. Melilotus siculus is a waterlogging- (i.e. root zone hypoxia) tolerant annual forage legume, but data were lacking for the effects of partial and full submergence of the shoots. The aim was to compare the tolerance to partial and full submergence of 15 M. siculus accessions and to assess variation in traits possibly contributing to tolerance. Recovery ability post-submergence was also evaluated.MethodsA factorial experiment imposed treatments of water level [aerated root zone with shoots in air as controls, stagnant root zone with shoots in air, stagnant root zone with partial (75 %) or full shoot submergence] on 15 accessions, for 7 d on 4-week-old plants in a 20/15 °C day/night phytotron. Measurements included: shoot and root growth, hyponastic petiole responses, petiole gas-filled spaces, leaflet sugars, leaflet surface hydrophobicity, leaflet gas film thickness and phellem area near the base of the main root. Recovery following full submergence was also assessed.Key ResultsAccessions differed in shoot and root growth during partial and full shoot submergence. Traits differing among accessions and associated with tolerance were leaflet gas film thickness upon submergence, gas-filled spaces in petioles and phellem tissue area near the base of the main root. All accessions were able to re-orientate petioles towards the vertical under both partial and full submergence. Petiole extension rates were maintained during partial submergence, but decreased during full submergence. Leaflet sugars accumulated during partial submergence, but were depleted during full submergence. Growth resumption after full submergence differed among accessions and was positively correlated with the number of green leaves retained at desubmergence.ConclusionsMelilotus siculus is able to tolerate partial and full submergence of at least 7 d. Leaflet surface hydrophobicity and associated gas film retention, petiole gas-filled porosity and root phellem abundance are important traits contributing to tolerance. Post-submergence recovery growth differs among accessions. The ability to retain green leaves is essential to succeed during recovery.

AB - Background and AimsSubmergence is a severe stress for most plants. Melilotus siculus is a waterlogging- (i.e. root zone hypoxia) tolerant annual forage legume, but data were lacking for the effects of partial and full submergence of the shoots. The aim was to compare the tolerance to partial and full submergence of 15 M. siculus accessions and to assess variation in traits possibly contributing to tolerance. Recovery ability post-submergence was also evaluated.MethodsA factorial experiment imposed treatments of water level [aerated root zone with shoots in air as controls, stagnant root zone with shoots in air, stagnant root zone with partial (75 %) or full shoot submergence] on 15 accessions, for 7 d on 4-week-old plants in a 20/15 °C day/night phytotron. Measurements included: shoot and root growth, hyponastic petiole responses, petiole gas-filled spaces, leaflet sugars, leaflet surface hydrophobicity, leaflet gas film thickness and phellem area near the base of the main root. Recovery following full submergence was also assessed.Key ResultsAccessions differed in shoot and root growth during partial and full shoot submergence. Traits differing among accessions and associated with tolerance were leaflet gas film thickness upon submergence, gas-filled spaces in petioles and phellem tissue area near the base of the main root. All accessions were able to re-orientate petioles towards the vertical under both partial and full submergence. Petiole extension rates were maintained during partial submergence, but decreased during full submergence. Leaflet sugars accumulated during partial submergence, but were depleted during full submergence. Growth resumption after full submergence differed among accessions and was positively correlated with the number of green leaves retained at desubmergence.ConclusionsMelilotus siculus is able to tolerate partial and full submergence of at least 7 d. Leaflet surface hydrophobicity and associated gas film retention, petiole gas-filled porosity and root phellem abundance are important traits contributing to tolerance. Post-submergence recovery growth differs among accessions. The ability to retain green leaves is essential to succeed during recovery.

U2 - 10.1093/aob/mcy153

DO - 10.1093/aob/mcy153

M3 - Article

JO - Annals of Botany

JF - Annals of Botany

SN - 0305-7364

ER -