Timescales and mechanisms of sediment transport and shoreline morphodynamics in a fringing reef system

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Coral reefs are unique sedimentary systems due to the strong link between ecological processes, the sediment reservoir,
and the morphology of the adjacent coastline. Although reef-fringed coastlines exist globally, there is limited understanding
of the dynamics governing sediment transport and shoreline morphology in these environments. Therefore, predicting future
changes to these coastlines in response to climate change requires a more in-depth, process-based understanding of these
systems. Here we utilize field and numerical techniques to examine the timescales and mechanisms of sediment transport along a section of Australia's largest fringing reef, Ningaloo Reef, under both typical and extreme (cyclonic) conditions.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Award date10 Oct 2017
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2017

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fringing reef
morphodynamics
sediment transport
shoreline
timescale
coast
reef
coral reef
climate change
sediment

Cite this

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title = "Timescales and mechanisms of sediment transport and shoreline morphodynamics in a fringing reef system",
abstract = "Coral reefs are unique sedimentary systems due to the strong link between ecological processes, the sediment reservoir,and the morphology of the adjacent coastline. Although reef-fringed coastlines exist globally, there is limited understandingof the dynamics governing sediment transport and shoreline morphology in these environments. Therefore, predicting futurechanges to these coastlines in response to climate change requires a more in-depth, process-based understanding of thesesystems. Here we utilize field and numerical techniques to examine the timescales and mechanisms of sediment transport along a section of Australia's largest fringing reef, Ningaloo Reef, under both typical and extreme (cyclonic) conditions.",
keywords = "sediment transport, fringing reef, Ningaloo reef, numerical model, radiometric dating, Coastal geomorphology",
author = "Cuttler, {Michael Vincent William}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.4225/23/59ed7cbc60f49",
language = "English",

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AU - Cuttler, Michael Vincent William

PY - 2017

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N2 - Coral reefs are unique sedimentary systems due to the strong link between ecological processes, the sediment reservoir,and the morphology of the adjacent coastline. Although reef-fringed coastlines exist globally, there is limited understandingof the dynamics governing sediment transport and shoreline morphology in these environments. Therefore, predicting futurechanges to these coastlines in response to climate change requires a more in-depth, process-based understanding of thesesystems. Here we utilize field and numerical techniques to examine the timescales and mechanisms of sediment transport along a section of Australia's largest fringing reef, Ningaloo Reef, under both typical and extreme (cyclonic) conditions.

AB - Coral reefs are unique sedimentary systems due to the strong link between ecological processes, the sediment reservoir,and the morphology of the adjacent coastline. Although reef-fringed coastlines exist globally, there is limited understandingof the dynamics governing sediment transport and shoreline morphology in these environments. Therefore, predicting futurechanges to these coastlines in response to climate change requires a more in-depth, process-based understanding of thesesystems. Here we utilize field and numerical techniques to examine the timescales and mechanisms of sediment transport along a section of Australia's largest fringing reef, Ningaloo Reef, under both typical and extreme (cyclonic) conditions.

KW - sediment transport

KW - fringing reef

KW - Ningaloo reef

KW - numerical model

KW - radiometric dating

KW - Coastal geomorphology

U2 - 10.4225/23/59ed7cbc60f49

DO - 10.4225/23/59ed7cbc60f49

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

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