Timely cancer diagnosis and management as a chronic condition: opportunities for primary care

M. Jiwa, Christobel Saunders, Sandra Thompson, L.K. Rosenwax, S. Sargant, E.L. Khong, G.K. Halkett, G. Sutherland, H.C. Ee, T.L. Packer, G. Merriman, H.R. Arnet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One in three men and one in four women in Australia will be diagnosed with cancer in the first 75 years of life.The majority will survive the cancer and ultimately die from unrelated causes.Many cancer patients and their families will experience some physical, social, economic and psychological sequelae, regardless of the prognosis.A recurring theme is that patients are disadvantaged by the lack of coordination of care and their needs are not being adequately met.We argue that greater integration of care through a multidisciplinary team of professionals, peer support groups and primary health practitioners functioning within a care hub could offer better practical and psychosocial supportive care for patients and their families.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)78-82
JournalMedical Journal of Australia
Volume189
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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Primary Health Care
Peer Group
Neoplasms
Self-Help Groups
Vulnerable Populations
Ataxia
Patient Care
Economics
Psychology
Health

Cite this

Jiwa, M. ; Saunders, Christobel ; Thompson, Sandra ; Rosenwax, L.K. ; Sargant, S. ; Khong, E.L. ; Halkett, G.K. ; Sutherland, G. ; Ee, H.C. ; Packer, T.L. ; Merriman, G. ; Arnet, H.R. / Timely cancer diagnosis and management as a chronic condition: opportunities for primary care. In: Medical Journal of Australia. 2008 ; Vol. 189, No. 2. pp. 78-82.
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Jiwa, M, Saunders, C, Thompson, S, Rosenwax, LK, Sargant, S, Khong, EL, Halkett, GK, Sutherland, G, Ee, HC, Packer, TL, Merriman, G & Arnet, HR 2008, 'Timely cancer diagnosis and management as a chronic condition: opportunities for primary care' Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 189, no. 2, pp. 78-82.

Timely cancer diagnosis and management as a chronic condition: opportunities for primary care. / Jiwa, M.; Saunders, Christobel; Thompson, Sandra; Rosenwax, L.K.; Sargant, S.; Khong, E.L.; Halkett, G.K.; Sutherland, G.; Ee, H.C.; Packer, T.L.; Merriman, G.; Arnet, H.R.

In: Medical Journal of Australia, Vol. 189, No. 2, 2008, p. 78-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Timely cancer diagnosis and management as a chronic condition: opportunities for primary care

AU - Jiwa, M.

AU - Saunders, Christobel

AU - Thompson, Sandra

AU - Rosenwax, L.K.

AU - Sargant, S.

AU - Khong, E.L.

AU - Halkett, G.K.

AU - Sutherland, G.

AU - Ee, H.C.

AU - Packer, T.L.

AU - Merriman, G.

AU - Arnet, H.R.

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N2 - One in three men and one in four women in Australia will be diagnosed with cancer in the first 75 years of life.The majority will survive the cancer and ultimately die from unrelated causes.Many cancer patients and their families will experience some physical, social, economic and psychological sequelae, regardless of the prognosis.A recurring theme is that patients are disadvantaged by the lack of coordination of care and their needs are not being adequately met.We argue that greater integration of care through a multidisciplinary team of professionals, peer support groups and primary health practitioners functioning within a care hub could offer better practical and psychosocial supportive care for patients and their families.

AB - One in three men and one in four women in Australia will be diagnosed with cancer in the first 75 years of life.The majority will survive the cancer and ultimately die from unrelated causes.Many cancer patients and their families will experience some physical, social, economic and psychological sequelae, regardless of the prognosis.A recurring theme is that patients are disadvantaged by the lack of coordination of care and their needs are not being adequately met.We argue that greater integration of care through a multidisciplinary team of professionals, peer support groups and primary health practitioners functioning within a care hub could offer better practical and psychosocial supportive care for patients and their families.

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JF - Medical Journal Australia

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