‘Three cheers to the old apple tree!’: wassailing and the affective performances of heritage

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The ancient practice of wassailing to apple trees has had global resurgence in recent years, including in Tasmania where it is performed at the Huon Valley Mid-Winter Fest. First recorded at Fordwich (England) in 1585, wassailing is performed annually on Old Twelfth Night and involves a parading group moving noisily between orchards. Taking the Huon Valley wassail as a focus, I will examine the performative elements of the modern wassail, tracing a genealogy of practice, to ask: what happens when wassailing is transplanted to Tasmania? What sorts of 'pasts' are recalled, and what emotional work does the wassail performance do?
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)141-162
Number of pages22
JournalParergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2019

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