There is no real evidence for a diminishing trend of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation

Albert Parker, Clifford Ollier

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is part of the great ocean “conveyor belt” that circulates heat around the globe. Since the early 2000s, ocean sensors have started to monitor the AMOC, but the measurements are still far from accurate and the time window does not permit the separation of short term variability from a longer term trend. Other works have claimed that global warming is slowing down the AMOC, based on models and proxies of temperatures. Some other observations demonstrate a stable circulation of the oceans. By using tide gauge data complementing recent satellite and ocean sensor observations, the stability of the AMOC is shown to go back to 1860. It is concluded that no available information has the due accuracy and time coverage to show a clear trend outside the inter-annual and multi-decadal variability in the direction of increasing or decreasing strength over the last decades.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)30-35
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of Ocean Engineering and Science
    Volume1
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 25 Jan 2016

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