The Well-Being of Carers of Older Aboriginal People Living in the Kimberley Region of Remote Western Australia: Empowerment, Depression, and Carer Burden

Dina LoGiudice, Cathryn M. Josif, Roslyn Malay, Zoë Hyde, Melissa Haswell, Melissa A. Lindeman, Christopher Etherton-Beer, David Atkinson, Dawn Bessarab, Leon Flicker, Kate Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To describe demographic features and well-being of carers of Aboriginal Australians aged ≥45 years in remote Western Australia. Method: Carer burden, empowerment, and depression were assessed in 124 Aboriginal carers in four remote Aboriginal communities. Results: Carers were aged 38.8 ± 15.0 years, 73.4% were female, and 75.8% were children or grandchildren of the person cared for. The mean Zarit-6 score was 3.7 ± 3.6. Attending high school (odds ratio [OR] = 0.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.1, 0.7]) and feeling empowered (OR = 0.2; 95% CI = [0.1, 0.8]) were inversely associated with carer burden; female carers were less likely to feel empowered (OR = 0.4; 95% CI = [0.2, 0.9]); and empowerment was inversely associated with depression (OR = 0.3; 95% CI = [0.1, 0.7]). Discussion: Aboriginal carers in remote communities are relatively young and most are children or grandchildren. Carer burden was lower than anticipated. However, existing tools may not adequately measure Aboriginal perspectives. Education and empowerment are key factors which support programs must consider.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)693-702
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Applied Gerontology
Volume40
Issue number7
Early online date1 Jan 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2021

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