The Vietnamese in Australia: diaspora identity, intra-group tensions, transnational ties and ‘victim’ status

Loretta Baldassar, Joanne Pyke, Danny Ben-Moshe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper examines how class, gender, generation and regional background impact on the development of diaspora and community identity as well as ties to homeland among Vietnamese migrants in Australia. Drawing on the empirical findings of a research project conducted in three Australian cities, we assess the character of the Vietnamese diaspora in Australia by critically applying Cohen’s (2008. Global Diasporas. London: Taylor and Francis) typology with a particular focus on what it means to be defined as a victim or refugee diaspora. The paper focuses on the intra-group differences in origins, socio-demographic characteristics, migration experience, gender and generation that characterise this group, highlighting the impact of recent arrivals on the established community. The latter are relatively well educated and actively connected to modern Vietnam through vibrant transnational linkages. These characteristics tend to create tensions with members of the established community who, in class terms, have struggled to thrive, are relatively cut off from the homeland and are united in their hostility towards the homeland government.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)937-955
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Volume43
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Apr 2017

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