The value of work and ‘common discourse’ in the joint management of Kakadu National Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Joint management at Kakadu National Park has been marked by conflict and discontent among the major actors, its Traditional Aboriginal Owners and the White rangers (and other staff) of the state. Despite such conflict, and structured differences between these groups of actors, the park continues to function. In this article I argue that the structures and actions perpetuating difference and conflict are usually more or less balanced by opposing structures and actions that draw the two groups of actors together. I further argue that the most important of such cohering structures and actions, what I call ‘common discourse’, derives from the work that both Aboriginal and White rangers perform in the field. This form of under-recognised discourse acts against the corrosive discourses of the separate groups that tend to perpetuate separateness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)72-87
Number of pages16
JournalAustralian Journal of Anthropology
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2017

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The value of work and ‘common discourse’ in the joint management of Kakadu National Park. / Haynes, Chris.

In: Australian Journal of Anthropology, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.04.2017, p. 72-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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