The use of nutritional supplementation to improve responses to the 'ram effect' in Merino ewes

Phillip Clemens Khaiseb

    Research output: ThesisMaster's Thesis

    114 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    In the development of 'clean, green and ethical' systems for sheep management, we can reduce our dependence on hormones
    for controlling reproduction by using pheromones from novel rams to induce ovulation (the 'ram effect'). With a view to improving the efficiency of the 'ram effect', we tested whether nutritional supplementation of the ewes would improve their responses. Supplementation did not increase the proportion of the ewe flock that ovulated or showed normal cycles. However, there was an increase In the frequency of multiple ovulations when supplementation was sustained well into the preovulatory stage of the ram induced oestrous cycle.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationMasters
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    Supervisors/Advisors
    • Martin, Graeme, Supervisor
    • Hawken, Penelope Alison, Supervisor
    Award date30 Nov 2017
    DOIs
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2016

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    ram effect
    Merino
    rams
    ovulation
    ewes
    estrous cycle
    pheromones
    flocks
    sheep

    Cite this

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    title = "The use of nutritional supplementation to improve responses to the 'ram effect' in Merino ewes",
    abstract = "In the development of 'clean, green and ethical' systems for sheep management, we can reduce our dependence on hormonesfor controlling reproduction by using pheromones from novel rams to induce ovulation (the 'ram effect'). With a view to improving the efficiency of the 'ram effect', we tested whether nutritional supplementation of the ewes would improve their responses. Supplementation did not increase the proportion of the ewe flock that ovulated or showed normal cycles. However, there was an increase In the frequency of multiple ovulations when supplementation was sustained well into the preovulatory stage of the ram induced oestrous cycle.",
    keywords = "reproduction, sheep, male effect, nutrition",
    author = "Khaiseb, {Phillip Clemens}",
    year = "2016",
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    language = "English",
    school = "The University of Western Australia",

    }

    The use of nutritional supplementation to improve responses to the 'ram effect' in Merino ewes. / Khaiseb, Phillip Clemens.

    2016.

    Research output: ThesisMaster's Thesis

    TY - THES

    T1 - The use of nutritional supplementation to improve responses to the 'ram effect' in Merino ewes

    AU - Khaiseb, Phillip Clemens

    PY - 2016

    Y1 - 2016

    N2 - In the development of 'clean, green and ethical' systems for sheep management, we can reduce our dependence on hormonesfor controlling reproduction by using pheromones from novel rams to induce ovulation (the 'ram effect'). With a view to improving the efficiency of the 'ram effect', we tested whether nutritional supplementation of the ewes would improve their responses. Supplementation did not increase the proportion of the ewe flock that ovulated or showed normal cycles. However, there was an increase In the frequency of multiple ovulations when supplementation was sustained well into the preovulatory stage of the ram induced oestrous cycle.

    AB - In the development of 'clean, green and ethical' systems for sheep management, we can reduce our dependence on hormonesfor controlling reproduction by using pheromones from novel rams to induce ovulation (the 'ram effect'). With a view to improving the efficiency of the 'ram effect', we tested whether nutritional supplementation of the ewes would improve their responses. Supplementation did not increase the proportion of the ewe flock that ovulated or showed normal cycles. However, there was an increase In the frequency of multiple ovulations when supplementation was sustained well into the preovulatory stage of the ram induced oestrous cycle.

    KW - reproduction

    KW - sheep

    KW - male effect

    KW - nutrition

    U2 - 10.4225/23/5a56ca07ef27a

    DO - 10.4225/23/5a56ca07ef27a

    M3 - Master's Thesis

    ER -