The Teaching Focus of Adult-Reading Teachers When Developing Word Reading Skills: Teacher focus in adult word reading

Janet Mary McHardy, Elaine Chapman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite widescale literacy interventions, reading difficulties persist in the adult population. Results from international surveys report that millions of adults around the world remain unable to read the texts they require for daily life and work. Adult reading difficulties are diverse and under‐researched, and adult‐reading teachers are generally underprepared to build reading skills, particularly at word level reading where many adults report difficulties. This study examined (i) the teaching foci that 60 adult‐reading teachers prioritised in determining how to teach a hypothetical adult reader with difficulties at the word level and (ii) the teacher attributes by which these decisions varied. Around 40% of teachers indicated that they would prioritise non‐word level components in deciding how to teach the hypothetical reader with word level difficulties, and these decisions varied with teachers' training/qualifications. To make sense of the persistence of low reading levels in the adult population, it is necessary to understand more about what teachers teach and why they teach the way they do. The findings of this study may provide an important step towards this goal.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages9
JournalLiteracy (Oxford)
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 4 Dec 2018

Fingerprint

Teaching
teacher
teacher training
qualification
persistence
Word Reading
Reading Skills
literacy
Reader

Cite this

@article{191a675172814ac98fb4400b00eeb670,
title = "The Teaching Focus of Adult-Reading Teachers When Developing Word Reading Skills: Teacher focus in adult word reading",
abstract = "Despite widescale literacy interventions, reading difficulties persist in the adult population. Results from international surveys report that millions of adults around the world remain unable to read the texts they require for daily life and work. Adult reading difficulties are diverse and under‐researched, and adult‐reading teachers are generally underprepared to build reading skills, particularly at word level reading where many adults report difficulties. This study examined (i) the teaching foci that 60 adult‐reading teachers prioritised in determining how to teach a hypothetical adult reader with difficulties at the word level and (ii) the teacher attributes by which these decisions varied. Around 40{\%} of teachers indicated that they would prioritise non‐word level components in deciding how to teach the hypothetical reader with word level difficulties, and these decisions varied with teachers' training/qualifications. To make sense of the persistence of low reading levels in the adult population, it is necessary to understand more about what teachers teach and why they teach the way they do. The findings of this study may provide an important step towards this goal.",
author = "McHardy, {Janet Mary} and Elaine Chapman",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "4",
doi = "10.1111/lit.12168",
language = "English",
journal = "Literacy (Oxford)",
issn = "0034-0472",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Teaching Focus of Adult-Reading Teachers When Developing Word Reading Skills: Teacher focus in adult word reading

AU - McHardy, Janet Mary

AU - Chapman, Elaine

PY - 2018/12/4

Y1 - 2018/12/4

N2 - Despite widescale literacy interventions, reading difficulties persist in the adult population. Results from international surveys report that millions of adults around the world remain unable to read the texts they require for daily life and work. Adult reading difficulties are diverse and under‐researched, and adult‐reading teachers are generally underprepared to build reading skills, particularly at word level reading where many adults report difficulties. This study examined (i) the teaching foci that 60 adult‐reading teachers prioritised in determining how to teach a hypothetical adult reader with difficulties at the word level and (ii) the teacher attributes by which these decisions varied. Around 40% of teachers indicated that they would prioritise non‐word level components in deciding how to teach the hypothetical reader with word level difficulties, and these decisions varied with teachers' training/qualifications. To make sense of the persistence of low reading levels in the adult population, it is necessary to understand more about what teachers teach and why they teach the way they do. The findings of this study may provide an important step towards this goal.

AB - Despite widescale literacy interventions, reading difficulties persist in the adult population. Results from international surveys report that millions of adults around the world remain unable to read the texts they require for daily life and work. Adult reading difficulties are diverse and under‐researched, and adult‐reading teachers are generally underprepared to build reading skills, particularly at word level reading where many adults report difficulties. This study examined (i) the teaching foci that 60 adult‐reading teachers prioritised in determining how to teach a hypothetical adult reader with difficulties at the word level and (ii) the teacher attributes by which these decisions varied. Around 40% of teachers indicated that they would prioritise non‐word level components in deciding how to teach the hypothetical reader with word level difficulties, and these decisions varied with teachers' training/qualifications. To make sense of the persistence of low reading levels in the adult population, it is necessary to understand more about what teachers teach and why they teach the way they do. The findings of this study may provide an important step towards this goal.

U2 - 10.1111/lit.12168

DO - 10.1111/lit.12168

M3 - Article

JO - Literacy (Oxford)

JF - Literacy (Oxford)

SN - 0034-0472

ER -