The star-formation history of the Universe with the Square Kilometre Array

Matt J. Jarvis, Nick Seymour, Jose Afonso, Philip Best, Rob Beswick, Ian Heywood, Minh Huynh, Eric Murphy, Isabella Prandoni, Eva Schinnerer, Chris Simpson, Mattia Vaccari, Sarah White

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

    Abstract

    Radio wavelengths offer the unique possibility of tracing the total star-formation rate in galaxies, both obscured and unobscured. As such, they may provide the most robust measurement of the star-formation history of the Universe. In this chapter we highlight the constraints that the SKA can place on the evolution of the star-formation history of the Universe, the survey area required to overcome sample variance, the spatial resolution requirements, along with the multi-wavelength ancillary data that will play a major role in maximising the scientific promise of the SKA. The required combination of depth and resolution means that a survey to trace the star formation in the Universe should be carried out with a facility that has a resolution of at least ∼ 0.5 arcsec, with high sensitivity at <1 GHz. We also suggest a strategy that will enable new parameter space to be explored as the SKA expands over the coming decade.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of Science
    Subtitle of host publicationAdvancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array
    EditorsRobert Braun, Grazia Umana
    PublisherProceedings of Science
    ISBN (Print)1824-8039
    Publication statusPublished - 2014
    EventAdvancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometer Array - Giardini Naxos, Italy
    Duration: 9 Jun 201413 Jun 2014
    https://pos.sissa.it/cgi-bin/reader/conf.cgi?confid=215

    Conference

    ConferenceAdvancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometer Array
    CountryItaly
    CityGiardini Naxos
    Period9/06/1413/06/14
    Internet address

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  • Cite this

    Jarvis, M. J., Seymour, N., Afonso, J., Best, P., Beswick, R., Heywood, I., Huynh, M., Murphy, E., Prandoni, I., Schinnerer, E., Simpson, C., Vaccari, M., & White, S. (2014). The star-formation history of the Universe with the Square Kilometre Array. In R. Braun, & G. Umana (Eds.), Proceedings of Science: Advancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array Proceedings of Science. https://pos.sissa.it/archive/conferences/215/068/AASKA14_068.pdf