The secret life of wildlife trypanosomes: Australian trypanosomes and their association with ticks (Ixodidae) and biting flies (Tabanidae)

Anna-Sheree Krige

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Trypanosomes are global parasites that are understudied in Australia. With a typical digenetic (two-host) life cycle that alternates between vertebrate hosts and invertebrate vectors, trypanosomes are capable of infecting almost all vertebrate classes. Molecular (HRM-qPCR with sequencing) and microscopy (FISH, confocal, epifluorescence, SEM) techniques were combined to investigate the presence of mammalian trypanosomes within Australian invertebrates including ticks and tabanids. Several native Trypanosoma species were detected from invertebrate tissues, with Trypanosoma noyesi visualised within questing ticks. Trypanosomes were further observed within the salivary glands and proboscis of tabanids. Future research is needed to confirm the life cycles of Australian trypanosomes.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Clode, Peta, Supervisor
  • Thompson, Richard Christopher Andrew, Supervisor, External person
  • Peacock, Christopher, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date24 Dec 2021
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2022

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