The Role of Ecological Linkage Mechanisms in Plasmodium knowlesi Transmission and Spread

Gael Davidson, Tock H Chua, Angus Cook, Peter Speldewinde, Philip Weinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Defining the linkages between landscape change, disease ecology and human health is essential to explain and predict the emergence of Plasmodium knowlesi malaria, a zoonotic parasite residing in Southeast Asian macaques, and transmitted by species of Anopheles mosquitos. Changing patterns of land use throughout Southeast Asia, particularly deforestation, are suggested to be the primary drivers behind the recent spread of this zoonotic parasite in humans. Local ecological changes at the landscape scale appear to be increasing the risk of disease in humans by altering the dynamics of transmission between the parasite and its primary hosts. This paper will focus on the emergence of P. knowlesi in humans in Malaysian Borneo and the ecological linkage mechanisms suggested to be playing an important role.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEcohealth
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 23 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Plasmodium knowlesi
parasite
Parasites
Zoonoses
Borneo
malaria
Plasmodium malariae
landscape change
mosquito
Southeastern Asia
deforestation
Anopheles
Conservation of Natural Resources
Macaca
Ecology
Culicidae
ecology
land use
Health

Cite this

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title = "The Role of Ecological Linkage Mechanisms in Plasmodium knowlesi Transmission and Spread",
abstract = "Defining the linkages between landscape change, disease ecology and human health is essential to explain and predict the emergence of Plasmodium knowlesi malaria, a zoonotic parasite residing in Southeast Asian macaques, and transmitted by species of Anopheles mosquitos. Changing patterns of land use throughout Southeast Asia, particularly deforestation, are suggested to be the primary drivers behind the recent spread of this zoonotic parasite in humans. Local ecological changes at the landscape scale appear to be increasing the risk of disease in humans by altering the dynamics of transmission between the parasite and its primary hosts. This paper will focus on the emergence of P. knowlesi in humans in Malaysian Borneo and the ecological linkage mechanisms suggested to be playing an important role.",
author = "Gael Davidson and Chua, {Tock H} and Angus Cook and Peter Speldewinde and Philip Weinstein",
year = "2019",
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day = "23",
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The Role of Ecological Linkage Mechanisms in Plasmodium knowlesi Transmission and Spread. / Davidson, Gael; Chua, Tock H; Cook, Angus; Speldewinde, Peter; Weinstein, Philip.

In: Ecohealth, 23.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Role of Ecological Linkage Mechanisms in Plasmodium knowlesi Transmission and Spread

AU - Davidson, Gael

AU - Chua, Tock H

AU - Cook, Angus

AU - Speldewinde, Peter

AU - Weinstein, Philip

PY - 2019/1/23

Y1 - 2019/1/23

N2 - Defining the linkages between landscape change, disease ecology and human health is essential to explain and predict the emergence of Plasmodium knowlesi malaria, a zoonotic parasite residing in Southeast Asian macaques, and transmitted by species of Anopheles mosquitos. Changing patterns of land use throughout Southeast Asia, particularly deforestation, are suggested to be the primary drivers behind the recent spread of this zoonotic parasite in humans. Local ecological changes at the landscape scale appear to be increasing the risk of disease in humans by altering the dynamics of transmission between the parasite and its primary hosts. This paper will focus on the emergence of P. knowlesi in humans in Malaysian Borneo and the ecological linkage mechanisms suggested to be playing an important role.

AB - Defining the linkages between landscape change, disease ecology and human health is essential to explain and predict the emergence of Plasmodium knowlesi malaria, a zoonotic parasite residing in Southeast Asian macaques, and transmitted by species of Anopheles mosquitos. Changing patterns of land use throughout Southeast Asia, particularly deforestation, are suggested to be the primary drivers behind the recent spread of this zoonotic parasite in humans. Local ecological changes at the landscape scale appear to be increasing the risk of disease in humans by altering the dynamics of transmission between the parasite and its primary hosts. This paper will focus on the emergence of P. knowlesi in humans in Malaysian Borneo and the ecological linkage mechanisms suggested to be playing an important role.

U2 - 10.1007/s10393-019-01395-6

DO - 10.1007/s10393-019-01395-6

M3 - Review article

JO - Ecohealth

JF - Ecohealth

SN - 1612-9202

ER -